Skip to content

Companies

How to Prepare to Strike Out on Your Own and Pursue Your Creative Calling

Pivotal Tracker Blog - Wed, 06/29/2016 - 18:30

Have you contemplated leaving the comforts of a company to strike out on your own to pursue a creative calling?

Perhaps you have an idea for a product or service. While there’s a strong pull to pursue it, hesitation maybe holding you back.

You’re worried about being good enough, attracting customers and clients, and how to make it all come together to find fulfillment, while at the same time tending to the practical side of things like paying the bills!

You’ve probably heard plenty of stories around striking out to build a startup, raise capital, and pursue a big idea. While that sounds exciting, you’re looking for an alternative approach…

Well, in today’s episode of FemgineerTV, we’re going to be tackling all these topics. To help us out, I’ve invited Jessica Hische, who is a letter, illustrator, and type designer.

Jessica began her career working for a design studio called HeadCase. She then went on to work for a prominent designer, Louise Fili, and eventually struck out on her own. Jessica has had notable clients like Wes Anderson, David Eggers, Tiffany Co, and Nike, just to name a few.

As you watch this episode, you’ll learn:

  • Steps you can take early in your career, such as how to reach out to people or companies you want to work for and learn from;
  • Why a day job can be immensely valuable and how to find one that is nurturing;
  • Why you don’t have to run a 10+ person design studio or a 100+ startup, and can be a solopreneur;
  • How to reconcile your client’s vision with your own creative desires;
  • How to get compensated fairly by conveying the price and value of your work;
  • Why learning tangential skills as a creative can be helpful when it comes to hiring; and
  • How to balance side projects and attract work with the day-to-day work that pays the bills.

Whether you’ve been in your career for 6 months or 6+ years, and have toyed with the idea of doing your own thing but weren’t sure how to set your own terms, this episode is for you!

For those of you who are interested in design and typography, check out Jessica’s latest book In Progress. We also talked about her popular post, “The Dark Art of Pricing,” which you can read here.

Listen to the episode on iTunes!

You can listen to the episode and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes. Please take a moment to leave us a review. Your positive review will help us get featured in the News & Noteworthy and bring more exposure to the work we’re doing as well as the talented guests we feature!

FemgineerTV is produced as a partnership between Femgineer and Pivotal Tracker. San Francisco video production by StartMotionMEDIA.

The post How to Prepare to Strike Out on Your Own and Pursue Your Creative Calling appeared first on Pivotal Tracker.

Categories: Companies

The Purpose Alignment Model

Xebia Blog - Wed, 06/29/2016 - 10:45
When scaling Agile/Scrum, we invariably run into the alignment vs. autonomy problem. In short, you cannot have autonomous, self-directing teams if they have no clue what direction they should go. Or, even shorter, alignment breeds autonomy. But how do we create alignment? And what tools can we use to quickly evaluate whether or not what
Categories: Companies

The Ultimate Tester: Sharing Knowledge

Xebia Blog - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 10:50
In the past three blog posts we have explored some aspects of being an Ultimate Tester: How we can add value, how our curiosity helps us to test the crazy stuff and how we can build quality in. We learn a lot about these things during work time (and hopefully during personal time as well),
Categories: Companies

Are You Agile Enough for DevOps?

Agile Management Blog - VersionOne - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 14:30

One of the biggest buzzwords in the industry lately is DevOps.  We all know by now what DevOps is intended to offer, and most organizations are looking for at least some subset of the promise of a continuous delivery flow … Continue reading →

The post Are You Agile Enough for DevOps? appeared first on The Agile Management Blog.

Categories: Companies

VersionOne & Collaborative Leadership Team Partnership Accelerates Agile Adoption

Agile Management Blog - VersionOne - Tue, 06/21/2016 - 14:30

VersionOne & Collaborative Leadership Team Accelerate Agile Adoption

Highlights

  • Strong partnership gets agile teams up and running four months ahead of schedule
  • Deep knowledge to help people at all levels adopt agile and lean practices
  • Extensive functionality to ensure business alignment and team collaboration

Challenges

As part of a large agile transformation initiative, one of the largest agribusiness and food companies in the U.S., needed an experienced consulting team and an agile ALM platform that could help them reach their goal of getting more than 25 agile teams, across several delivery groups, up and running over a 12-month period.

The company needed assistance with constructing a plan, and coaching the teams while working with executives through the process change. Since the company was using disparate systems, they also needed one platform that could help them manage initiatives across the organization, break the work down across multiple teams and programs, while ensuring alignment with business goals. At the same time, they needed a way to foster better collaboration across the teams with different agile work styles.

Solution

The company engaged with trusted partner, Collaborative Leadership Team to evaluate how VersionOne Lifecycle could support the overall rollout plan at all levels. After an evaluation of many agile ALM vendors, the company selected VersionOne for the team’s responsiveness, as well as the extensive platform functionality that would help their teams easily adopt and scale agile across the organization.

Benefits

The partners quickly engaged with the customer’s delivery teams and groups to implement the joint solution and get the company’s agile transformation started. The Collaborative Leadership Team had deep knowledge of how to apply agile principles and how to support people in adopting agile and lean practices.  And with VersionOne Lifecycle, the company gained the ability to successfully plan, track, collaborate, and report within the platform, so that everyone could have visibility into the work being delivered. In fact, one of the managers said, “The TeamRoom just blows the socks off of navigating in Rally. We needed an easy way for teams to get the information they needed.”

Working together, Collaborative Leadership Team and VersionOne were able to get all of the teams and delivery groups to a stable and productive state four months ahead of schedule.  It was fantastic to see how the consultants became trusted and well respected advisors throughout the organization, while allowing the teams the ability to be self-reliant and to continuously improve on their own.  At the same, it was great to see how people at all levels in the organization were able to start using the VersionOne and start seeing the results of a successful implementation right away.

 

The post VersionOne & Collaborative Leadership Team Partnership Accelerates Agile Adoption appeared first on The Agile Management Blog.

Categories: Companies

How to Keep flowtype Running and Report Errors on Save

Xebia Blog - Tue, 06/21/2016 - 09:00
We use flow from Facebook to run type checking on our codebase. When you run ‘flow status’ it starts a flow server in the background and keeps it running. That way after the first run the results of each next run are almost instant. The only thing currently lacking is a watch mode, but there
Categories: Companies

Connect with VersionOne at Agile2016

Agile Management Blog - VersionOne - Thu, 06/16/2016 - 14:30

Connect with VersionOne at Agile2016

Dates: July 25 – 29
Location: Hyatt Regency, Atlanta, GA
Event URL:    https://www.agilealliance.org/agile2016/

VersionOne is proud to be a title sponsor of Agile2016. The annual Agile Conference is always exciting for us, but this year we are especially excited because Agile2016 is being held in our hometown, Atlanta!

The VersionOne Diner

If you’re planning to attend the 2016 Agile Show in Atlanta, be sure to stop by the VersionOne Diner—our booth—and get All You Can Eat Strategy, Development and Delivery. This is a great opportunity to learn about the VersionOne Enterprise Agile Platform and how VersionOne has been serving up 100% genuine agile since 2002. Also stop by the VersionOne booth to register for our daily raffle. There will be a new winner each day.

VersionOne Speakers

Be sure to check out these presentations from VersionOne team members:

Career Growth, Recognition, and Continuous Learning for

Software Craftspeople
Steve Ropa
Tuesday, July 26 – 10:45 am – 12:00 pm

In this presentation Steve Ropa will share a Software Craftsman approach, based on his experience of many years and many development organizations, to help further the learning and career development for your team. 

Intentional Learning – Map a Successful Strategy
Claire Moss
Wednesday, July 27 – 2:00 pm – 3: 15 pm

In this workshop inspired by Dan North and Chris Matt’s work in skills mapping, you will chart your own learning adventure based on where you are now, and where you want to be in the future.

A Hands-On Introduction to Exploratory Testing
Claire Moss
Thursday, July 28 – 9:00 am – 10:15 am

In this hands-on introduction to Exploratory Testing, attendees will bring a laptop, pair with a buddy, hear a little theory on test design, open a real application, and get to testing.

Purpose Driven Teams
Matt Badgley
Thursday, July 28 – 3:45 pm – 5:00 pm

This session will explore the science and power of purpose—how purpose enables engagement, improves team morale, and can improve performance. Matt Badgley will share some simple techniques that leaders and team members can use to help clarify their purpose.

Agile2016 Overview

Hosted by the Agile Alliance, the Agile2016 conference is one of the best opportunities to meet fellow agile practitioners, from all disciplines, sharing their knowledge, experience, and passion about agile. More than 2,500 agile practitioners from 40 countries are expected to attend this year’s conference which includes over 200 sessions on agile related topics spanning 18 tracks including: Leadership, DevOps, Enterprise Agile, Government, and more.

Agile2016 attendees will walk away with practical and pragmatic strategies and tactics for furthering agile in their teams and organizations.

Connect with VersionOne at Agile2016

We look forward to welcoming you to our hometown, Atlanta!

The post Connect with VersionOne at Agile2016 appeared first on The Agile Management Blog.

Categories: Companies

Obscure Gradle Error: RSA premaster secret error

A little madness - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 05:30

Just a quick post in case anyone else runs into the same obscure scenario. Setting up a new Gradle project on my OSX dev machine, the build could not download any files from Maven Central. When trying to establish an SSH connection I was getting:

RSA premaster secret error

A web search didn’t turn up much, making it clear this was not a common issue. The only hits I found where outdated or unusual configurations, whereas I believed I had a pretty vanilla setup.

Long story short, the problem was I had globally set the java.ext.dirs system property to the empty string to prevent another, unrelated (and equally obscure) error in the past. That was too blunt an approach — the JVM at the very least needs $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/ext to be included in java.ext.dirs to load some core jars, including sunjce_provider.jar which includes implementations of the encryption algorithms required to establish SSL connections. User error on my part, which I paid for with wasted time — I hope this post saves someone from the same mistake!

Categories: Companies

All the small things

Agile Zen - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 20:19

Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve released a few small changes:

1) Links no longer open in the same window.

2) The backlog can now be pinned open. If you click the thumbtack in the backlog, it will stay open until you unpin it for that project.

thumbtack

3) You can now have cards default to the top of a phase instead of the bottom. Your setting will be persisted by project.

add-to-top

Thanks!

Categories: Companies

[Recap] Fast IT: Concepts and Examples from Assembla and Attivio

Assembla Blog - Thu, 07/31/2014 - 22:51

Last week, Sid Probstein, CTO of Attivio, and Andy Singleton, founder of Assembla presented a webinar about “Fast IT,” a new way of managing rapidly changing and Agile projects in areas like mobile, Web, analytics and marketing applications, while working smoothly with reliable core systems ("Core IT"). Andy discussed the dynamics of Fast IT, and Sid presented a case study of how Attivio spun up a major Business Intelligence app in two weeks with two people.

If you missed the webinar, view and download the slides

Want an overview of Fast IT in 60 seconds? Watch the video below:

Get notified about new and exciting content around Fast IT by completing the form below:

//

Categories: Companies

Assembla now allows automatic payments with PayPal

Assembla Blog - Fri, 07/25/2014 - 20:17

Paying for your Assembla subscription with PayPal has never been easier. We recently added the ability to set up recurring payments with PayPal that will automatically pay for your Assembla subscription every billing period, whether that be monthly or annually. Previously, it was a manual process that required logging in and paying every time an invoice was created.

To set up automatic payments with PayPal, visit your billing page > select the PayPal option > and follow the steps.

assembla paypal option1

If you have any questions or issues, please contact Assembla support at support@assembla.com.

Categories: Companies

Post Assembla events to your favorite chat apps: Slack, HipChat, Flowdock & more

Assembla Blog - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 02:26

If your team uses Slack, HipChat, Flowdock, or Bigplans for communication, we have added preconfigured webhooks to make setting up these integrations painless. Once configured, you can selectively manage the Assembla events that are posted out to these apps, such as ticket activity, commits, deploys, etc., to monitor project activity in real-time, inline with other team communication.

To get started, click on the desired integration below: slack logo HipChat Logo flowdock logo Bigplans logo
Categories: Companies

Interested in cryptocurrencies? Get started with 1000 free Ripple XRP

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 20:55

ripple logo

Ripple is a protocol for value exchange that makes it easy to transfer and trade fiat currencies, Bitcoin, or XRP - the native asset of the Ripple network.

Assembla is giving away 1000 free XRP (the Ripple native cyptocurrency) to any person with software development skills who is interested in learning about Ripple development. Get it here: https://www.assembla.com/ripple

I called Ripple Labs a few months ago to find out more about ways that their "gateway" can help us pay developers in many different countries. Essentially, we do banking for the developers on our global team. We pay internal accounts, hold the money until they ask for it, and then transfer money to them by bank wire, ATM/Payoneer, or other mechanisms. We have found that the bank wire system is embarrassingly slow and unreliable. This is the problem that Ripple is trying to fix. Their gateway is like a bank in an open-source box. It keeps accounts in any currency, including USD, other currencies, XRP, and Bitcoin. It can transfer those accounts instantly and reliably on the shared "ledger." It is also gaining exciting new features such as "multi-signature" which enables outsourcing and crowdsourcing customers to post a budget amount, and then transfer it to their hard-working suppliers through an arbitrator.

Now I am working more closely with Ripple to help them scale up their development process. I decided to make this free XRP offer for two reasons:

  • Users need 20 XRP to activate a Ripple wallet. We want to remove the hassle from acquiring the XRP so new developers can get started.
  • We want to build an email list of developers that might be interested in working on internal development, bounties, or bank integration projects.
ripple blog CTA
Categories: Companies

Assembla Bigplans Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 18:26

If you use Assembla and Bigplans, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your Bigplans chat room. Check out below for configuration instructions.

Bigplans is a simple, integrated way to manage a distributed team.  It includes a "lean" task board, real-time chat, and a unique "advisor" (a real person) that helps you get on-demand resources if you need them.  For programming teams, it includes a tight integration with Assembla login and Assembla tickets. 

You can use the Webhooks tool to feed Assembla events into any of your team chats.  To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select Bigplans from the list of pre-configured post options:

Bigplans Assembla Webhook

You will need to obtain and update the auth token in the “Content” section.

To obtain your Bigplans auth token:

Visit Bigplans and navigate to the plan you want to post Assembla events to. Click on the ‘Connect’ option in the top bar. Under the “Message API” section, there is a section called “API Token” that will display your token. If no token is set, click on the ‘Reset’ button. Copy the token ID and replace the “BIGPLANS_AUTH_TOKEN” in the Webhook tool.

Bigplans Assembla Webhook Token

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your Bigplans chat room and click ‘Add and Authenticate.” Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured Bigplans chat room:

Bigplans Assembla Webhook Chat

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

Assembla & Slack Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 14:23

If you use Assembla and Slack, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your Slack chat room/channel. Check out below for configuration instructions.

To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select Slack from the list of pre-configured post options:

Slack Assembla Webhook

You will need to setup an incoming webhook service integration within Slack to obtain your token. To do this, visit https://YourSubdomain.slack.com/services/new/incoming-webhook, select the desired channel to post to, and click ‘Add Incoming Webhook.’

describe the image

Once created, copy the provided Webhook URL and update the External URL in Assembla’s Webhook tool.

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your Slack room/channel and click ‘Add and Authenticate.' Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Tip: Within the Slack “Incoming Webhook” page that you set up for this integration, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and expand the “Integration Settings” where you can add a label, change the post-to channel, and change the icon and name for your webhook bot.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured Slack room/channel:

describe the image

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

Assembla & HipChat Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 13:40

If you use Assembla and HipChat, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your HipChat chat room. Check out below for configuration instructions. 

To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select HipChat from the list of pre-configured post options:

HipChat Assembla Webhook

You will need to obtain and update the auth token and room ID in the “Content” section.

To obtain your HipChat auth token:

You will need to visit https://YourSubdomain.hipchat.com/admin/api and enter your password to access the “API Auth Tokens” page. Under “Create new token” select ‘Notification’ type, provide a label, and click ‘Create.’ Copy the token ID and replace the “HIPCHAT_AUTH_TOKEN” in the Webhook tool.

describe the image

To obtain your HipChat room ID:

Visit https://YourSubdomain.hipchat.com/admin/rooms and click on the desired room you would like to post Assembla events to. Copy the App ID and replace the “HIPCHAT_ROOM_ID” in the Webhook tool.

describe the image

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your HipChat room and click ‘Add and Authenticate.” Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured HipChat room:

HipChat Assembla Example Chat

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

[Webinar] "Fast IT": Concepts and Examples from Assembla and Attivio

Assembla Blog - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 17:41

Join us on July 23, 2014 from 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM EDT for a webinar “Fast IT”: Concepts and Examples from Assembla and Attivio.

describe the image

When we at Assembla heard about the 2-2-2 project structure used by Attivio, we knew we had a fun story and a big idea to share.  The fun story is the way that Attivio can spin-up major Business Intelligence apps with 2-day, 2-person prototyping sessions. The big idea is “Fast IT”: a way of managing fast and Agile projects, while working smoothly with your slower, more reliable core systems: "Core IT".

In this Webinar, Sid Probstein, CTO of Attivio, and Andy Singleton, founder of Assembla, will share their discoveries about ways that “Core” and “Fast” can work smoothly together.  We will show tools that help you wrap and index your Core IT so that you can easily use it in Fast IT projects.  And, we’ll show how to professionally launch and manage an expanding portfolio of Fast IT projects for analytics, Web, mobile and marketing applications and SaaS integration. 

This Webinar is designed to help IT professionals or project managers who are handling analytics, Web, mobile, cloud and marketing applications.

describe the image

Presented By:

assembla logo rectangle    Attivio logo

Categories: Companies

Success Story: GLG Boosts “Customer Equity” with Assembla

Assembla Blog - Tue, 06/24/2014 - 17:25
GLG Logo Challenge

Garrigan Lyman Group was worried about losing the loyalty of its own customers. The agency was expanding rapidly and tackling more complex e-commerce, mobile, social media and video projects. Clients had no visibility into when new requests would be delivered. Development managers were having trouble tracking releases and matching resources to requirements. Teams needed a solution to prevent missing deadlines and ensure the quality of delivery.

Objective

Chris “Whitey” Geiser, GLG’s CTO, knew that the agency could not afford to lose “customer equity,” the hard-won confidence that GLG could deliver innovative digital marketing solutions. So he and his team began looking for technologies that could help them centralize processes, manage development requests, and improve communications with clients.

Results

Assembla has helped Garrigan Lyman Group win new business from existing clients. The solution has helped GLG evolve from helping clients with flashy but self-contained marketing projects, to solutions that work with the core of their businesses. It allows the company to collaborate better with clients and improve control of their development processes.

To see how GLG learned to work more closely with its customers,
fill out the form below to download the full case study.

//

Categories: Companies

Episode #138 – Principles or Practices

Integrum - Agile Weekly Podcast - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 15:00

Derek Neighbors, Jade Meskill, Clayton Lengel-Zigich, and Roy van de Water discuss:

  • What is more important, principles or practices?
Email
Categories: Companies

Episode #137 – Central Control

Integrum - Agile Weekly Podcast - Thu, 05/08/2014 - 15:00

Derek Neighbors, Jade Meskill, Clayton Lengel-Zigich, and Roy van de Water discuss:

  • What happens when someone has central control

Transcript

Derek Neighbors:  Hello, and welcome to another episode of Agile Weekly Podcast. I’m Derek Neighbors.

Roy van de Water:  I’m Roy van de Water.

Jade Meskill:  I’m Jade Meskill

Clayton Lengel‑Zigich:  I’m Clayton Lengel‑Zigich

Derek:  We’ve got another fantastic, hypothetical situation.

[laughter]

Derek:  You may spot this in the wild, I don’t know. We’re talking about things that could potentially maybe happen, someday, to some teams.

Say you had a czar of a department, or a unit, or a job function.

Roy:  Like a real Russian Tsar?

Derek:  Yeah, like an architect…

[laughter]

Jade:  I’m a Marxist, sorry.

Derek:  In the hypothetical situation, we would probably see this as being an architect, or maybe be a designer of some kind. When I say designer, I mean the chief of the companies, the [inaudible 00:55] top guy.

Jade:  Or the head programmer?

Derek:  The head jock honcho.

Jade:  On the team, the technical lead or something?

Derek:  Not even that. Above the technical lead, the top of the food chain. They have this stance that says, “The only thing that can done can only go to production if I have approved it.”

Roy:  You’re saying everything has to go through this guy?

Derek:  Everything has to go through this gal. She is totally 100 percent, “The design, every pixel has to be done by me,” or “Every single method has to be approved by me if we’re writing code.”

This person works in a large organization, thousands of people per se, and lo and behold, they can’t go to every planning meeting.

The good news is they have some mini‑czars that they can send out to these planning meetings. They can go to these planning meetings, and help the developers and the designers do things.

Then what happens is all sorts of decisions happen in a planning meeting. When these mini‑czars come back to the big honcho, the big honcho says, “Nope, I don’t like it. It needs to be this way.” Now they go back to the team and have to tell the team, “Sorry.’”

[crosstalk]

Derek:  …What does that look like? What happens? How do you fix that? How do you rectify that situation? What are the downsides to that stuff?

Roy:  First off, is there anything wrong with that?

Clayton:  Yeah, I’ll take the devil’s advocate approach. The reason that all the design has to go through that one person is because if you want to maintain a consistent brand experience for the end‑user, you can’t just let people ‑‑ especially developers who don’t have any design sense ‑‑ to go off and do a bunch of crazy stuff.

Roy:  There’s a bunch of awesome examples where I’ve seen exactly that with Google. In fact, I’ve heard, Derek, you complained about this specifically that Google has all of these products out there of totally different experiences, that are totally not integrating because they’re all being developed in isolation.

Derek:  Ever since their designs are [inaudible 02:56] left…

[laughter]

Derek:  They have not been on‑brand.

Jade:  I’ve seen these on the development side, too, where you’ve got all these dumb programmers that we hired that are up there writing a bunch of crap. If they could just do it like me, everything would be so much better.

Derek:  Yeah, where do you think our tech‑level of that comes from?

Jade:  Yeah. [laughs]

Clayton:  I suppose we pay these people six figure to be morons.

Derek:  The dumbest, highest paid people, we have.

[laughter]

Roy:  I get that. The guy at the top, his neck is on the line if should go south, he wants to make sure that everything goes north. Right?

Derek:  Yeah, it’s pretty scalable, they are able to ship a lot of production software this way.

Clayton:  That’s a trade‑off. If you go through this bottleneck where one person has to approve everything, obviously everything goes very slowly, and you don’t ship very often.

Jade:  And you redo a lot.

Clayton:  Yeah, you probably use a lot of rework, as obviously the market’s going to change, and you’re going to have to go back and fix things and change your strategy. But theoretically, everything looks pretty good, and it’s pretty close to being “perfect” when it does ship.

Roy:  I guess that depends on their value system then. Do you value the ability to move fast, to make changes and respond to changing requirements in the changing world? Or do you prefer to have a perfect experience? Because I could see value in both of those.

Derek:  Yeah, if a lot of people really applaud Apple and Steve Jobs and what he did ‑‑ he certainly was not interested in shipping on a very tight schedule and going very fast. He was much more concerned about shipping perfect products than he was shipping bad products more frequently.

Roy:  Right. Another example is like Rolls‑Royce or something, where, I don’t care if it has the latest and greatest features, but…Hold on, let’s be clear here. I’m not buying a Rolls‑Royce.

[laughter]

Roy:  I could see people don’t really care about [inaudible 04:46] features, they care about every product being extremely high quality. I don’t know if they actually have this, but I could see them having a philosophy like the CEO hand‑checks every single car before it leaves the factory, because they insist on having that premium experience, and that everything is perfect.

Jade:  Apple’s an interesting case, because they’ve shipped a lot of great hardware. They shipped a lot of really poor software that is not consistent and not very good.

Derek:  You’ve obviously used their online store before.

Jade:  [laughs] Yeah.

Clayton:  I’ve always had a tough time with the Apple comparison. I think that’s the first one that people jump to, but no one ever really acknowledges the difference in hardware.

Jade:  It’s much harder to fix hardware once it’s gone up the book.

Clayton:  Yeah, so that’s different. That’s something that we should clarify.

Derek:  When I look at this hypothetical situation, the thing that I think is the biggest pain for me or the biggest thing that I see that people aren’t talking about, is what does it feel like being a team member who goes through a planning meeting with a group of people and comes up with a solution and an idea only to, an hour later or a day later or two days later, say, “Uhh, what you’re doing is really stupid and really dumb. This is the right way to do it. Throw away everything you’ve done and go do this other thing instead.”

What does that feel like as a team member, do you think?

Roy:  I can see two parts to that. First off, we talked a lot about autonomous teams. I would feel like, as a team member, a large part of your autonomy gets taken away if someone comes back and says, “You have to do it my way.”

If it’s taken from the standpoint of, “Hey, have you considered using other options”? And they are truly better ideas. If you follow the core commitments and you choose to always seek to better an idea and to accept any idea no matter where it comes from, then that sounds like it would only be a positive experience.

I think that how that interaction takes place, and the attitude of both parties, has a huge impact on how that’s going to go down.

Clayton:  I would feel pretty useless and like my time was being wasted. I would probably not even bother attending. Or if I did attend, it would just be for show. I would probably not even be paying attention because, really, what difference does it make?

Roy:  But there is a difference. Clayton, if I came to you. Let’s say you plan on a Monday and I come to you on a Wednesday. I say, “Hey, I saw what you guys planned out on Monday. Have you considered using other possibilities”? Would you have that same reaction?

Clayton:  If you said, “Had you considered these other possibilities”? We had some dialog, and I said, “OK, let’s talk about it next Monday.” I think that would be one thing. If you said, “Put the brakes on. Really think hard about these other choices, because you’re doing them no matter what.” Then I would feel like, “What’s the point. Why did I waste that time”?

Jade:  I can tell you what it’s like to be on the other side of that. I’ve been that person. It sucks. You can’t trust anybody. You are paranoid and you need to be…

Roy:  Just to be clear, what side are you talking about?

Jade:  The person who’s the bottleneck. Who…

Roy:  Oh, I see.

Jade:  …is changing things for everybody.

Roy:  And insisting that your rules be followed?

Jade:  Yeah. It’s a very crappy position to be in. You don’t sleep well. You’re not relaxed. You’re always stressed out because everything is going wrong around you all the time. You don’t trust anybody. I think that’s really where…that’s the core of the issue. You don’t trust anybody.

Derek:  In this particular hypothetical, there’s also a middle person. We’ve not talked about that middle person. Not only is the person that is doing the work probably leaving frustrated…

Roy:  So you’re talking about the Vice Czar in this, right?

Derek:  The Vice Czar goes into this thing thinking, “Oh, I totally represent the attitudes and the patterns and the thinking of my boss.” We go in and I walk out thinking, “Man, this is all going to be really good.” Then I go back and they say, “Why did you make this decision? You’re letting them do that? I can’t believe that”!

Now, not only do I have to feel like maybe my boss doesn’t trust me, but now I have to go deliver that news to a whole group of people to say, “Hey guys, even though I said that this was probably the right thing to do, as it turns out, the Grand Czar does not agree with me.”

What does that got to feel like?

Clayton:  You lose face with the other people. I know that I told you that it was good, or that we agreed that it was good, but it turns out that it’s not. So either I can play that off as, “The czar guy is a real jerk. Man, what an asshole! I hate that guy too.” Or you would have to just hope that people aren’t thinking, “This person is really stupid. They don’t understand what their boss wants. Man, I’m not going to bother asking their opinion anymore.”

Roy:  Right. Even the boss is probably getting frustrated with them. They’re coming back with ideas representing the team. It’s probably not what the boss wants in the first place. They’re never going to think the same way. So this person is probably just getting shit on from both sides.

Derek:  So we’ve got the hypothetical. We’ve got some of maybe how it feels to be all of the roles in the hypothetical. How would you go about fixing it?

Roy:  In my opinion, if you can figure out some way to have the team earn the Czar’s trust and rid the organization of the Czar, not rid of the person but rid of the role, I think that will go a long way. Somebody who is insistent on all of these best practices, good coding styles, good design, or whatever, they should be going out and championing all of those things and explaining why it’s so important and really convincing people and winning them over rather than telling them what to do.

Jade:  A lot of times they do have a lot of really great knowledge and sometimes even some special insight that other people don’t have, but you’re right.

They should be going out and helping those other people to gain that skill and also experience things from the other side of the fence.

The things that are changing during planning or the real complexities on the ground of dealing with this on the fly, those type of things so that there is some empathy for what the people are going through while they’re out dealing with these situations.

But again, it comes back to building trust with those people. You believe that they’re doing the best thing that they can.

Roy:  It gets tough though when you set up a system like that in which you’re like, “I’m the one who is going to decide on the design, so Clayton don’t even bother wasting time coming up with designs or whatever.”

“Don’t even bother coming up with the method definitions because I’m going to shoot it down and give my own implementation anyway.”

Now all of a sudden Clayton hates me, and it’s going to be really difficult for Clayton to earn my trust because he is going to be trying to get away as much as he can to please the people that are breathing down his neck without getting my ire.

He is going to be subverting me, which is going to cause me to trust him even less like that’s just going to be a feedback loop.

Clayton:  There are definitely cases where people get in this situation like what Jade described like no trust and I don’t think most people would want to be in that, but there are some people who do enjoy the aspect of controlling everything.

They want to be the hero and they want to be seen as the smartest guy in the room and all that stuff.

I would say that probably is a pretty big component in a lot of these cases compared to the person who really doesn’t want it to be that way all the time, but it’s just like, “Oh, woe is me,” it just happened to be that way.

There is some aspect to that. I think unwinding some of that desire for control where they don’t feel like all of their self‑worth at their job is based on whether or not they got all the answers right all the time. I think that could go a long way.

Derek:  When I look at it, Steve Jobs might be a good example. I didn’t know Steve and I certainly didn’t see him work, but I would…

Roy:  Me and old buddy Steve, yeah.

Derek:  I think that if I were to…

Roy:  I call him Steve.

Derek:  …guess how he operated, he trusted his people. Because I don’t think he could get the results he got without trusting them. What he wanted to control was the essence of the spirit of the products that were put out.

Not necessarily how they were built and so to me the difference is you come back from a planning meeting and I say, “Oh my God, you’re doing all the stuff wrong and this is how you should have done it.” I don’t think that’s how Steve operated.

He probably operated in a “I’m going to let you do whatever and when you show it to me, if it’s crap, I’m going to say it’s crap, but I’m not going to ship that and fuck you go do it right, and when you get it right, we will ship it. Until then, leave me alone, don’t waste my time.”

“Why did you call me to this fucking demo that sucks this bad”? What I think is very, very different than saying, “I’m going to tell you exactly how to do every little thing.”

I might tell you at the demo to say like “I’m not doing that and I had expected this.” And I think that’s a subtle difference, but that’s very different than trying to control how everybody does their job.

Instead of saying here’s the bar of expectation and I’m going to make you live up to that, I’m not going to tell you how to live up to it.

Jade:  I think that’s right.

Derek:  How do you get somebody to get to the point where they’re allowed to let the essence of what their standard is hold but not have total mistrust.

Jade:  I think there are some systemic problems in that as well that that person is probably being held accountable for those decisions by their people.

Getting some understanding put in place there is a big help. To help their boss see that like they don’t need to be held to that.

They need to be held to the standard of they’re making everyone around them better and helping them achieve that essence and not being a control freak.

Because usually it’s people that don’t want to do that. They end up in that situation because of some externality.

Derek:  Right, fear usually, they’re afraid of something.

Roy:  I wonder if people that are successful at it and managed to climb their way to the top might not be the ones that enjoy it though.

Jade:  There are people that enjoy having that control like Clayton said, and those people might not be able to help them.

Derek:  All right. See you next month.

[music]

Announcer:  Is there’s something you’d like to hear in a future episode? Head over to integrumtech.com/podcast, where you can suggest a topic or a guest.

Looking for an easy way to stay up‑to‑date with the latest news, techniques, and events in the Agile community? Sign up today at AgileWeekley.com. It’s the best Agile content, delivered weekly for free.

The Agile Weekly Podcast is brought to you by Integrum Technologies, and recorded at Gangplank Studios in Chandler, Arizona. For old episodes, check out integrumtech.com, or subscribe on iTunes.

Need help with your Agile transition? Have a question and need to phone a friend? Try calling the Agile Hotline. It’s free. Call 866‑244‑8656.

Email
Categories: Companies