Skip to content

J.D. Meier's Blog
Syndicate content
Program Management, Shaping Software, and Making Things Happen
Updated: 4 hours 40 min ago

3 Challenges to Help You Set New Benchmarks in Innovation

Mon, 07/28/2014 - 19:39

If you want to change your game, you need to know what the key challenges are.

Innovation is a game that you can play much better, if you know where and how to debottleneck it.

In the book The Future of Management, Gary Hamel shares 3 challenges that he believes can help you unleash your organization’s capacity for innovation.

  1. How can you enroll every individual within your company in the work of innovation, and equip each one with creativity-boosting tools?
  2. How can you ensure that top management's hallowed beliefs don't straightjacket innovation, and that heretical ideas are given the chance to prove their worth?
  3. How can you create the time and space for grassroots innovation in an organization that is running flat to deliver today's results?

According to Hamel, "Make progress on these challenges and your company will set new benchmarks in innovation."

If I think back through the various teams I’ve been on at Microsoft, one team that I was on was especially good at helping innovation flourish, and we were constantly pushing the envelope to “be what’s next.”   Our innovation flourished the most when we directly addressed the challenges above.  People were challenged to share and test their ideas more freely and innovation was baked into how we planned our portfolio, programs, and projects.

Innovation was a first-class citizen – by design.

You Might Also Like

High-Leverage Strategies for Innovation

Innovation Life Cycle

Lessons Learned from the Most Successful Innovators

The Drag of Old Mental Models on Innovation and Change

The New Realities that Call for New Organizational and Management Capabilities

Categories: Blogs

Fearless Speaking

Sat, 07/26/2014 - 18:58

“Do one thing every day that scares you.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt

I did a deep dive book review.

This time, I reviewed Fearless Speaking.

The book is more than meets the eye.

It’s actually a wealth of personal development skills at your fingertips and it’s a powerful way to grow your personal leadership skills.

In fact, there are almost fifty exercises throughout the book.

Here’s an example of one of the techniques …

Spotlight Technique #1

When you’re overly nervous and anxious as a public speaker, you place yourself in a ‘third degree’ spotlight.  That’s the name for the harsh bright light police detectives use in days gone by to ‘sweat’ a suspect and elicit a confession.  An interrogation room was always otherwise dimly lit, so the source of light trained on the person (who was usually forced to sit in a hard straight backed chair) was unrelenting.

This spotlight is always harsh, hot, and uncomfortable – and the truth is, you voluntarily train it on yourself by believing your audience is unforgiving.  The larger the audience, the more likely you believe that to be true.

So here’s a technique to get out from under this hot spotlight that you’re imagining so vividly turn it around! Visualize swiveling the spotlight so it’s aimed at your audience instead of you.  After all, aren’t you supposed to illuminate your listeners? You don’t want to leave them in the dark, do you?

There’s no doubt that it’s cooler and much more comfortable when you’re out under that harsh light.  The added benefit is that now the light is shining on your listeners – without question the most important people in the room or auditorium!

I like that there are so many exercises and techniques to choose from.   Many of them don’t fit my style, but there were several that exposed me to new ways of thinking and new ideas to try.

And what’s especially great is knowing that these exercise come from professional actors and speakers – it’s like an insider’s guide at your fingertips.

My book review on Fearless Speaking includes a list of all the exercises, the chapters at a glance, key features from the book, and a few of my favorite highlights from the book (sort of like a movie trailer for the book.)

You Might Also Like

7 Habits of Highly Effective People at a Glance

347 Personal Effectiveness Articles to Help You Change Your Game

Effectiveness Blog Post Roundup

Categories: Blogs

The Drag of Old Mental Models on Innovation and Change

Fri, 07/25/2014 - 18:06

“Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats.” — Howard Aiken

It's not a lack of risk taking that holds innovation and change back. 

Even big companies take big risks all the time.

The real barrier to innovation and change is the drag of old mental models.

People end up emotionally invested in their ideas, or they are limited by their beliefs or their world views.  They can't see what's possible with the lens they look through, or fear and doubt hold them back.  In some cases, it's even learned helplessness.

In the book The Future of Management, Gary Hamel shares some great insight into what holds people and companies back from innovation and change.

Yesterday’s Heresies are Tomorrow’s Dogmas

Yesterday's ideas that were profoundly at odds with what is generally accepted, eventually become the norm, and then eventually become a belief system that is tough to change.

Via The Future of Management:

“Innovators are, by nature, contrarians.  Trouble is, yesterday's heresies often become tomorrow's dogmas, and when they do, innovation stalls and the growth curve flattens out.”

Deeply Held Beliefs are the Real Barrier to Strategic Innovation

Success turns beliefs into barriers by cementing ideas that become inflexible to change.

Via The Future of Management:

“... the real barrier to strategic innovation is more than denial -- it's a matrix of deeply held beliefs about the inherent superiority of a business model, beliefs that have been validated by millions of customers; beliefs that have been enshrined in physical infrastructure and operating handbooks; beliefs that have hardened into religious convictions; beliefs that are held so strongly, that nonconforming ideas seldom get considered, and when they do, rarely get more than grudging support.”

It's Not a Lack of Risk Taking that Holds Innovation Back

Big companies take big risks every day.  But the risks are scoped and constrained by old beliefs and the way things have always been done.

Via The Future of Management:

“Contrary to popular mythology, the thing that most impedes innovation in large companies is not a lack of risk taking.  Big companies take big, and often imprudent, risks every day.  The real brake on innovation is the drag of old mental models.  Long-serving executives often have a big chunk of their emotional capital invested in the existing strategy.  This is particularly true for company founders.  While many start out as contrarians, success often turns them into cardinals who feel compelled to defend the one true faith.  It's hard for founders to credit ideas that threaten the foundations of the business models they invented.  Understanding this, employees lower down self-edit their ideas, knowing that anything too far adrift from conventional thinking won't win support from the top.  As a result, the scope of innovation narrows, the risk of getting blindsided goes up, and the company's young contrarians start looking for opportunities elsewhere.”

Legacy Beliefs are a Much Bigger Liability When It Comes to Innovation

When you want to change the world, sometimes it takes a new view, and existing world views get in the way.

Via The Future of Management:

“When it comes to innovation, a company's legacy beliefs are a much bigger liability than its legacy costs.  Yet in my experience, few companies have a systematic process for challenging deeply held strategic assumptions.  Few have taken bold steps to open up their strategy process to contrarian points of view.  Few explicitly encourage disruptive innovation.  Worse, it's usually senior executives, with their doctrinaire views, who get to decide which ideas go forward and which get spiked.  This must change.”

What you see, or can’t see, changes everything.

You Might Also Like

The New Competitive Landscape

The New Realities that Call for New Organizational and Management Capabilities

Who’s Managing Your Company

Categories: Blogs