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Program Management, Shaping Software, and Making Things Happen
Updated: 2 hours 50 min ago

What is Insight?

Wed, 07/29/2015 - 18:34

"A moment's insight is sometimes worth a life's experience." -- Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

Some say we’re in the Age of Insight.  Others say insight is the new currency in the Digital Economy.

And still others say that insight is the backbone of innovation.

Either way, we use “insight” an awful lot without talking about what insight actually is.

So, what is insight?

I thought it was time to finally do a deeper dive on what insight actually is.  Here is my elaboration of “insight” on Sources of Insight:

Insight

You can think of it as “insight explained.”

The simple way that I think of insight, or those “ah ha” moments, is by remembering a question Ward Cunningham uses a lot:

“What did you learn that you didn’t expect?” or “What surprised you?”

Ward uses these questions to reveal insights, rather than have somebody tell him a bunch of obvious or uneventful things he already knows.  For example, if you ask somebody what they learned at their presentation training, they’ll tell you that they learned how to present more effectively, speak more confidently, and communicate their ideas better.

No kidding.

But if you instead ask them, “What did you learn that you didn’t expect?” they might actually reveal some insight and say something more like this:

“Even though we say don’t shoot the messenger all the time, you ARE the message.”

Or

“If you win the heart, the mind follows.”

It’s the non-obvious stuff, that surprises you (at least at first).  Or sometimes, insight strikes us as something that should have been obvious all along and becomes the new obvious, or the new normal.

Ward used this insights gathering technique to more effectively share software patterns.  He wanted stories and insights from people, rather than descriptions of the obvious.

I’ve used it myself over the years and it really helps get to deeper truths.  If you are a truth seeker or a lover of insights, you’ll enjoy how you can tease out more insights, just by changing your questions.   For example, if you have kids, don’t ask, “How was your day?”   Ask them, “What was the favorite part of your day?” or “What did you learn that surprised you?”

Wow, I now this is a short post, but I almost left without defining insight.

According to the dictionary, insight is “The capacity to gain an accurate and deep intuitive understanding of a person or thing.”   Or you may see insight explained as inner sight, mental vision, or wisdom.

I like Edward de Bono’s simple description of insight as “Eureka moments.”

Some people count steps in their day.  I count my “ah-ha” moments.  After all, the most important ingredient of effective ideation and innovation is …yep, you guessed it – insight!

For a deeper dive on the power of insight, read my page on Insight explained, on Sources Of Insight.com

Categories: Blogs

The Best Productivity Book for Free

Wed, 07/22/2015 - 18:04

image"At our core, Microsoft is the productivity and platform company for the mobile-first and cloud-first world." -- Satya Nadella

We take productivity seriously at Microsoft. Ask any Softie. I never have a lack of things to do, or too much time in my day, and I can't ever make "too much" impact.

To be super productive, I've had to learn hard-core prioritization techniques, extreme energy management, stakeholder management, time management, and a wealth of productivity hacks to produce better, faster results.

We don’t learn these skills in school.  But if we’re lucky, we learn from the right mentors and people all around us, how to bring out our best when we need it the most.

Download the 30 Days of Getting Results Free eBook

You can save years of pain for free:

30 Days of Getting Results Free eBook

There’s always a gap between books you read and what you do in the real world. I wanted to bridge this gap. I wanted 30 Days of Getting Results to be raw and real to help you learn what it really takes to master productivity and time management so you can survive and thrive with the best in the world.

It’s not pretty.  It’s super effective.

30 Days of Getting Results is a 30 Day Personal Productivity Improvement Sprint

I wrote 30 Days of Getting Results using a 30 Day Sprint. Each day for that 30 Day Sprint, I wrote down the best information I learned from the school of hard knocks about productivity, time management, work-life balance, and more.

For each day, I share a lesson, a story, and an exercise.

I wanted to make it easy to practice productivity habits.

Agile Results is a Fire Starter for Personal Productivity

The thing that’s really different about Agile Results as a time management system is that it’s focused on meaningful results.  Time is treated as a first-class citizen so that you hit your meaningful windows of opportunity, and get fresh starts each day, each week, each month, each year.  As a metaphor, you get to be the author of your life and write your story forward.

For years, I’ve received emails from people around the world how 30 Days of Getting Results was a breath of fresh air for them.

It helped them find their focus, get more productive, enjoy what they do, renew their energy, and spend more time in their strengths and their passions, while pursuing their purpose.

It’s helped doctors, teachers, students, lawyers, developers, grandmothers, and more.

Learn a New Language, Change Careers, or Start a Business

You can use Agile Results to learn better, faster, and deeper because it helps you think better, feel better, and take better action.

You can use Agile Results to help you learn a new language, build new skills, learn an instrument, or whatever your heart desires.

I used the system to accidentally write a book in a month.

I didn’t set out to write a book. I set out to share the world’s best insight and action for productivity and time management. I wrote for 20 minutes each day, during that month, to share the best lessons and the best insights I could with one purpose:

Help everyone thrive in work and life.

Over the coming months, I had more and more people ask for a book version. As much as they liked the easy to flip through Web pages, they wanted to consume it as an eBook. So I turned 30 Days of Getting Results into a free eBook and made that available.

Here's the funny part:

I forgot I had done that.

The Accidental Free Productivity Book that Might Just Change Your Life

One day, I was having a conversation with one of my readers, and they said that I should sell 30 Days of Getting Results as a $30 work book. They liked it much more than the book, Getting Results the Agile Way. They found it to be more actionable and easier to get started, and they liked that I used the system as a way to teach the system.

They said I should make the effort to put it together as a PDF and sell it as a workbook. He said people would want to pay for it because it’s high-value, real-world training, and he said it was better than any live training he had ever taken (and he had taken a lot.)

I got excited by the idea, and it made perfect sense. After all, wouldn’t people want to learn something that could impact every single day of their lives, and help them achieve more in work and life and help them adapt and compete more effectively in our ever-changing world?

I went to go put it together, and I had already done it.

Set Your Productivity on Fire

When you’re super productive, it’s easy to forget some of the things you create because they so naturally flow from spending the right time, on the right things, with the right energy. You’ll naturally leave a trail of results from experimenting and learning.

Whether you want to be super productive, or do less, but accomplish more, check out the ultimate free productivity guide:

30 Days of Getting Results Free eBook

Share it with friends, family, colleagues, and whoever else you want to have an unfair advantage in our hyper-competitive world.

Lifting others up, lifts you up in the process.

If you have a personal story of how 30 Days of Getting Results has helped you in some way, feel free to share it with me.  It’s always fun to hear how people are using Agile Results to take on new challenges, re-invent their productivity, and operate at a higher level.

Or simply get started again … like a fresh start, for the first time, full of new zest to be your best.

Categories: Blogs

How To Get Smarter By Making Distinctions

Sat, 07/18/2015 - 09:17

"Whatever you do in life, surround yourself with smart people who'll argue with you." -- John Wooden

There’s a very simple way to get smarter.

You can get smarter by creating categories.

Not only will you get smarter, but you’ll also be more mindful, and you’ll expand your vocabulary, which will improve your ability to think more deeply about a given topic or domain.

In my post, The More Distinctions You Make, the Smarter You Get, I walk through the ins and outs of creating categories to increase your intelligence, and I use the example of “fat.”   I attempt to show how “Fat is bad” isn’t very insightful, and how by breaking “fat” down into categories, you can dive deeper and reveal new insight to drive better decisions and better outcomes.

I’m this post, I’m going to walk this through with an example, using “security” as the topic.

The first time I heard the word “security”, it didn’t mean much to me, beyond “protect.”

The next thing somebody taught me, was how I had to focus on CIA:  Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability.

That was a simple way to break security down into meaningful parts.

And then along came Defense in Depth.   A colleague explained that Defense in Depth meant thinking about security in terms of multiple layers:  Network, Host, Application, and Data.

But then another colleague said, the real key to thinking about security and Defense in Depth, was to think about it in terms of people, process, and technology.

As much as I enjoyed these thought exercises, I didn’t find them actionable enough to actually improve software or application security.  And my job was to help Enterprise developers build better Line-Of-Business applications that were scalable and secure.

So our team went to the drawing board to map out actionable categories to take application security much deeper.

Right off the bat, just focusing on “application” security vs. “network” security or “host” security, helped us to get more specific and make security more tangible and more actionable from an Line-of-Business application perspective.

Security Categories

Here are the original security categories that we used to map out application security and make it more actionable:

  1. Input and Data Validation
  2. Authentication
  3. Authorization
  4. Configuration Management
  5. Sensitive Data
  6. Session Management
  7. Cryptography
  8. Exception Management
  9. Auditing and Logging

Each of these buckets helped us create actionable principles, patterns, and practices for improving security.

Security Categories Explained

Here is a brief description of each application security category:

Input and Data Validation
How do you know that the input your application receives is valid and safe? Input validation refers to how your application filters, scrubs, or rejects input before additional processing. Consider constraining input through entry points and encoding output through exit points. Do you trust data from sources such as databases and file shares?

Authentication
Who are you? Authentication is the process where an entity proves the identity of another entity, typically through credentials, such as a user name and password.

Authorization
What can you do? Authorization is how your application provides access controls for resources and operations.

Configuration Management
Who does your application run as? Which databases does it connect to? How is your application administered? How are these settings secured? Configuration management refers to how your application handles these operational issues.

Sensitive Data
How does your application handle sensitive data? Sensitive data refers to how your application handles any data that must be protected either in memory, over the network, or in persistent stores.

Session Management
How does your application handle and protect user sessions? A session refers to a series of related interactions between a user and your Web application.

Cryptography
How are you keeping secrets (confidentiality)? How are you tamper-proofing your data or libraries (integrity)? How are you providing seeds for random values that must be cryptographically strong? Cryptography refers to how your application enforces confidentiality and integrity.

Exception Management
When a method call in your application fails, what does your application do? How much do you reveal? Do you return friendly error information to end users? Do you pass valuable exception information back to the caller? Does your application fail gracefully?

Auditing and Logging
Who did what and when? Auditing and logging refer to how your application records security-related events.

As you can see, just by calling out these different categories, you suddenly have a way to dive much deeper and explore application security in depth.

The Power of a Security Category

Let’s use a quick example.  Let’s take Input Validation.

Input Validation is a powerful security category, given how many software security flaws and how many vulnerabilities and how many attacks all stem from a lack of input validation, including Buffer Overflows.

But here’s the interesting thing.   After quite a bit of research and testing, we found a powerful security pattern that could help more applications stand up to more security attacks.  It boiled down to the following principle:

Validate for length, range, format, and type.

That’s a pithy, but powerful piece of insight when it comes to implementing software security.

And, when you can’t validate the input, make it safe by sanitizing the output.  And along these lines, keep user input out of the control path, where possible.

All of these insights flow from just focusing on Input Validation as a security category.

Threats, Attacks, Vulnerabilities, and Countermeasures

Another distinction our team made was to think in terms of threats, attacks, vulnerabilities, and countermeasures.  We knew that threats could be intentional and malicious (as in the case of attacks), but they could also be accidental and unintended.

We wanted to identify vulnerabilities as weaknesses that could be addressed in some way.

We wanted to identify countermeasures as the actions to take to help mitigate risks, reduce the attack surface, and address vulnerabilities.

Just by chunking up the application security landscape into threats, attacks, vulnerabilities, and countermeasures, we empowered more people to think more deeply about the application security space.

Security Vulnerabilities Organized by Security Categories

Using the security categories above, we could easily focus on finding security vulnerabilities and group them by the relevant security category.

Here are some examples:

Input/Data Validation

  • Using non-validated input in the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) output stream
  • Using non-validated input used to generate SQL queries
    Relying on client-side validation
  • Using input file names, URLs, or user names for security decisions
  • Using application-only filters for malicious input
  • Looking for known bad patterns of input
  • Trusting data read from databases, file shares, and other network resources
  • Failing to validate input from all sources including cookies, query string parameters, HTTP headers, databases, and network resources

Authentication

  • Using weak passwords
  • Storing clear text credentials in configuration files
  • Passing clear text credentials over the network
  • Permitting over-privileged accounts
  • Permitting prolonged session lifetime
  • Mixing personalization with authentication

Authorization

  • Relying on a single gatekeeper
  • Failing to lock down system resources against application identities
  • Failing to limit database access to specified stored procedures
  • Using inadequate separation of privileges

Configuration Management

  • Using insecure administration interfaces
  • Using insecure configuration stores
  • Storing clear text configuration data
  • Having too many administrators
  • Using over-privileged process accounts and service accounts

Sensitive Data

  • Storing secrets when you do not need to
  • Storing secrets in code
  • Storing secrets in clear text
  • Passing sensitive data in clear text over networks

Session Management

  • Passing session identifiers over unencrypted channels
  • Permitting prolonged session lifetime
  • Having insecure session state stores
  • Placing session identifiers in query strings

Cryptography

  • Using custom cryptography
  • Using the wrong algorithm or a key size that is too small
  • Failing to secure encryption keys
  • Using the same key for a prolonged period of time
  • Distributing keys in an insecure manner

Exception Management

  • Failing to use structured exception handling
  • Revealing too much information to the client

Auditing and Logging

  • Failing to audit failed logons
  • Failing to secure audit files
  • Failing to audit across application tiers
Threats and Attacks Organized by Security Categories

Again, using our security categories, we could then group threats and attacks by relevant security categories.

Here are some examples of security threats and attacks organized by security categories:

Input/Data Validation

  • Buffer overflows
  • Cross-site scripting
  • SQL injection
  • Canonicalization attacks
  • Query string manipulation
  • Form field manipulation
  • Cookie manipulation
  • HTTP header manipulation

Authentication

  • Network eavesdropping
  • Brute force attacks
  • Dictionary attacks
  • Cookie replay attacks
  • Credential theft

Authorization

  • Elevation of privilege
  • Disclosure of confidential data
  • Data tampering
  • Luring attacks

Configuration Management

  • Unauthorized access to administration interfaces
  • Unauthorized access to configuration stores
  • Retrieval of clear text configuration secrets
  • Lack of individual accountability

Sensitive Data

  • Accessing sensitive data in storage
  • Accessing sensitive data in memory (including process dumps)
  • Network eavesdropping
  • Information disclosure

Session Management

  • Session hijacking
  • Session replay
  • Man-in-the-middle attacks

Cryptography

  • Loss of decryption keys
  • Encryption cracking

Exception Management

  • Revealing sensitive system or application details
  • Denial of service attacks

Auditing and Logging

  • User denies performing an operation
  • Attacker exploits an application without trace
  • Attacker covers his tracks
Countermeasures Organized by Security Categories

Now here is where the rubber really meets the road.  We could group security countermeasures by security categories to make them more actionable.

Here are example security countermeasures organized by security categories:

Input/Data Validation

  • Do not trust input
  • Validate input: length, range, format, and type
  • Constrain, reject, and sanitize input
  • Encode output

Authentication

  • Use strong password policies
  • Do not store credentials
  • Use authentication mechanisms that do not require clear text credentials to be passed over the network
  • Encrypt communication channels to secure authentication tokens
  • Use HTTPS only with forms authentication cookies
  • Separate anonymous from authenticated pages

Authorization

  • Use least privilege accounts
  • Consider granularity of access
  • Enforce separation of privileges
  • Use multiple gatekeepers
  • Secure system resources against system identities

Configuration Management

  • Use least privileged service accounts
  • Do not store credentials in clear text
  • Use strong authentication and authorization on administrative interfaces
  • Do not use the Local Security Authority (LSA)
  • Avoid storing sensitive information in the Web space
  • Use only local administration

Sensitive Data

  • Do not store secrets in software
  • Encrypt sensitive data over the network
  • Secure the channel

Session Management

  • Partition site by anonymous, identified, and authenticated users
  • Reduce session timeouts
  • Avoid storing sensitive data in session stores
  • Secure the channel to the session store
  • Authenticate and authorize access to the session store

Cryptography

  • Do not develop and use proprietary algorithms (XOR is not encryption. Use platform-provided cryptography)
  • Use the RNGCryptoServiceProvider method to generate random numbers
  • Avoid key management. Use the Windows Data Protection API (DPAPI) where appropriate
  • Periodically change your keys

Exception Management

  • Use structured exception handling (by using try/catch blocks)
  • Catch and wrap exceptions only if the operation adds value/information
  • Do not reveal sensitive system or application information
  • Do not log private data such as passwords

Auditing and Logging

  • Identify malicious behavior
  • Know your baseline (know what good traffic looks like)
  • Use application instrumentation to expose behavior that can be monitored

As you can see, the security countermeasures can easily be reviewed, updated, and moved forward, because the actionable principles are well organized by the security categories.

There are many ways to use creating categories as a way to get smarter and get better results.

In the future, I’ll walk through how we created an Agile Security approach, using categories.

Meanwhile, check out my post on The More Distinctions You Make, the Smarter You Get to gain some additional insights into how to use empathy and creating categories to dive deeper, learn faster, and get smarter on any topic you want to take on.

Categories: Blogs

We Help Our Customers Transform

Sat, 07/18/2015 - 08:34

"Innovation—the heart of the knowledge economy—is fundamentally social." -- Malcolm Gladwell

I’m a big believer in having clarity around what you help your customers do.

I was listening to Satya Nadella’s keynote at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, and I like how he put it so simply, that we help our customers transform.

Here’s what Satya had to say about how we help our customers transform their business:

“These may seem like technical attributes, but they are key to how we drive business success for our customers, business transformation for our customers, because all of what we do, collectively, is centered on this core goal of ours, which is to help our customers transform.

When you think about any customer of ours, they're being transformed through the power of digital technology, and in particular software.

There isn't a company out there that isn't a software company.

And our goal is to help them differentiate using digital technology.

We want to democratize the use of digital technology to drive core differentiation.

It's no longer just about helping them operate their business.

It is about them excelling at their business using software, using digital technology.

It is about our collective ability to drive agility for our customers.

Because if there is one truth that we are all faced with, and our customers are faced with, it's that things are changing rapidly, and they need to be able to adjust to that.

And so everything we do has to support that goal.

How do they move faster, how do they interpret data quicker, how are they taking advantage of that to take intelligent action.

And of course, cost.

But we'll keep coming back to this theme of business transformation throughout this keynote and throughout WPC, because that's where I want us to center in on.

What's the value we are adding to the core of our customer and their ability to compete, their ability to create innovation.

And anchored on that goal is our technical ambition, is our product ambition.”

Transformation is the name of the game.

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Categories: Blogs

Satya Nadella on a Mobile-First, Cloud-First World

Sat, 07/18/2015 - 08:11

You hear Mobile-First, Cloud-First all the time.

But do you ever hear it really explained?

I was listening to Satya Nadella’s keynote at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, and I like how he walked through how he thinks about a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world.

Here’s what Satya had to say:

“There are a couple of attributes.

When we talk about Mobile-First, we are talking about the mobility of the experience.

What do we mean by that?

As we look out, the computing that we are going to interface with, in our lives, at home and at work, is going to be ubiquitous.

We are going to have sensors that recognize us.

We are going to have computers that we are going to wear on us.

We are going to have computers that we touch, computers that we talk to, the computers that we interact with as holograms.

There is going to be computing everywhere.

But what we need across all of this computing, is our experiences, our applications, our data.

And what enables that is in fact the cloud acting as a control plane that allows us to have that capability to move from device to device, on any given day, at any given meeting.

So that core attribute of thinking of mobility, not by being bound to a particular device, but it's about human mobility, is very core to our vision.

Second, when we think about our cloud, we think distributed computing will remain distributed.

In fact, we think of our servers as the edge of our cloud.

And this is important, because there are going to be many legitimate reasons where people will want digital sovereignty, people will want data residency, there is going to be regulation that we can't anticipate today.

And so we have to think about a distributed cloud infrastructure.

We are definitely going to be one of the key hyper-scale providers.

But we are also going to think about how do we get computing infrastructure, the core compute, storage, network, to be distributed throughout the world.

These may seem like technical attributes, but they are key to how we drive business success for our customers, business transformation for our customers, because all of what we do, collectively, is centered on this core goal of ours, which is to help our customers transform.”

That’s a lot of insight, and very well framed for creating our future and empowering the world.

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Categories: Blogs

Empower Every Person on the Planet to Achieve More

Sat, 07/18/2015 - 06:32

It’s great to get back to the basics, and purpose is always a powerful starting point.

I was listening to Satya Nadella’s keynote at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, and I like how he walked through the Microsoft mission in a mobile-first, cloud-first world.

Here’s what Satya had to say:

“Our mission:  Empowering every person and every business on the planet to achieve more.

(We find that by going back into our history and re-discovering that core sense of purpose, that soul ... a PC in every home, democratizing client/server computing.)

We move forward to a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world.

We care about empowerment.

There is no other ecosystem that is primarily, and solely, built to help customers achieve greatness.

We are focused on helping our customers achieve greatness through digital technology.

We care about both individuals and organizations.  That intersection of people and organizations is the cornerstone of what we represent as excellence.

We are a global company.  We want to make sure that the power of technology reaches every country, every vertical, every organization, irrespective of size.

There will be many goals.

What remains constant is this sense of purpose, the reason why this ecosystem exists.

This is a mission that we go and exercise in a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world.”

If I think back to why I originally joined Microsoft, it was to empower every person on the planet to achieve more.

And the cloud is one powerful enabler.

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Categories: Blogs

Skilled for Life

Sat, 07/11/2015 - 21:15

A while back, a colleague challenged me to find something simple and sticky for the big idea behind Sources of Insight.  After trying several phrases, here’s the one that stuck:

Skilled for Life

He liked it because it had punch.  It also had a play on words, and you could read it two different ways.

I like it because it captured the big idea behind Sources of Insight.   The whole purpose behind the site is to help as many people improve the quality of their life as possible.

With skill.

I’ve found that skills can make or break somebody’s chance for success.   And, I don’t just mean from a career perspective.   To be effective in all areas of our life, we need skills across several domains:

  • Mind
  • Body
  • Emotions
  • Career
  • Finance
  • Relationships
  • Fun

Skilled for Life is meant to be a very simple phrase, with a very intentional outcome:

Equip you with the skills you need to survive and thrive in today’s world.

It’s all about personal empowerment.

Not everybody gets the right mentors, or the right training, or the right breaks.   So Sources of Insight is designed from the ground up to be your personal success library that helps you make your own breaks, create your opportunities, and own your destiny.

How?

By sharing the world’s best insight and action for work and life.  By providing you with very real skills for mastering emotional intelligence, intellectual horsepower, creative brilliance, interpersonal relationships, career growth, health, and happiness (yeah, happiness is a skill you can learn).  And by providing you with principles, patterns, and practices for a smarter, more creative, and more capable you.

To give you one simple example of how happiness is a skill, let me tell you about the three paths of happiness according to Dr. Martin Seligman:

  1. The Pleasant Life
  2. The Good Life
  3. The Meaningful Life

You can think of them like this:  The Pleasant Life is all about pleasures, here and now.  The Good Life is about spending more time in your values.  The Meaningful Life is about fulfillment by helping the greater good, using your unique skills.   It’s giving our best where we have our best to give, and moving up Maslow’s stack.

When you know the three paths of happiness, you can more effectively build your happiness muscles.  For example, you can Discover Your Values, so that you can spend more time in them, and live life on your terms.

That’s just one example of how you can improve your self-efficacy with skill.

There is a vast success library of everything from inspirational quotes to inspirational heroes, as well as principles, patterns, and practices for skills to pay the bills and lead a better life.  Sources of Insight is a dojo of personal development, and your jump start for realizing your potential.

I invite you to check out the following page on Sources of Insight, where I share what Skilled for Life is all about:

Skilled for Life

Skills empower you.

Categories: Blogs

Dealing with People You Can’t Stand

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 16:46

“If You Want To Go Fast, Go Alone. If You Want To Go Far, Go Together” – African Proverb

I blew the dust off some olds posts to rekindle some of the most important information for work and life.

It’s about dealing with people you can’t stand.

Whether you think of them as jerks, bullies, or just difficult people, the better you can deal with difficult people, the better you can get things done and make things happen.

And the more you learn how to bring out the best, in people at their worst, the less you’ll find people you can’t stand.

How To Bring Out the Best in People at Their Worst (Including Yourself)

Everything I needed to learn about dealing with difficult people, I learned from the book Dealing with People You Can’t Stand: How to Bring Out the Best in People at Their Worst, by Dr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirschner.

It’s one of the most brilliant, thoughtful books I’ve ever read on interpersonal skills and dealing with all sorts of bad behaviors.

The real key to dealing with difficult behavior is more than just recognizing bad behaviors in other people.

It’s recognizing bad behaviors in yourself, the kind that contribute to and amplify other people’s bad behaviors.

The more you know, the more you grow, and this is truly one of those transformational books.

Learn How To Deal with Difficult People (and Gain Some Mad Interpersonal Skills)

I’ve completely re-written my pot that provides an overview of the big ideas in Dealing with People You Can’t Stand:

Dealing with People You Can’t Stand

Even better, I’ve re-written all of my posts that talk through the 10 Types of Difficult People, and what to do about them.

I have to warn you:  Once you learn the 10 Types of Difficult People, you’ll be using the labels to classify bad behaviors that you experience in the halls, in meetings, behind your back, etc.

With that in mind, here they are …

10 Types of Difficult People

Here are the 10 Types of Difficult People at a glance:

  1. Grenade Person – After a brief period of calm, the Grenade person explodes into unfocused ranting and raving about things that have nothing to do with the present circumstances.
  2. Know-It-Alls – Seldom in doubt, the Know-It-All person has a low tolerance for correction and contradiction. If something goes wrong, however, the Know-It-All will speak with the same authority about who’s to blame – you!
  3. Maybe Person – In a moment of decision, the Maybe Person procrastinates in the hope that a better choice will present itself.
  4. No Person – A No Person kills momentum and creates friction for you. More deadly to morale than a speeding bullet, more powerful than hope, able to defeat big ideas with a single syllable.
  5. Nothing Person – A Nothing Person doesn’t contribute to the conversation. No verbal feedback, no nonverbal feedback, Nothing. What else could you expect from … the Nothing Person.
  6. Snipers – Whether through rude comments, biting sarcasm, or a well-timed roll of the eyes, making you look foolish is the Sniper’s specialty.
  7. Tanks – The Tank is confrontational, pointed and angry, the ultimate in pushy and aggressive behavior
  8. Think-They-Know-It-Alls – Think-They-Know-It-All people can’t fool all the people all the time, but they can fool some of the people enough of the time, and enough of the people all of the time – all for the sake of getting some attention.
  9. Whiners – Whiners feel helpless and overwhelmed by an unfair world. Their standard is perfection, and no one and nothing measures up to it.
  10. Yes Person – In an effort to please people and avoid confrontation, Yes People say “yes” without thinking things through.

I warned you.  Are you already thinking about some Snipers in a few meetings that you have, or is there a Yes Person driving you nuts (or are you that Yes Person?)

Have you talked to a Think-They-Know-It-All lately, or worse, a Know-It—All?

Never fear, I’ve included actionable insights and recommendations for dealing with all the various bad behaviors you’ll encounter.

The Lens of Human Understanding

If all this talk about dealing with difficult people, and having silly labels seems like a gimmick, it’s not.  It’s actually deep insight rooted in a powerful, but simple framework that Dr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirschner refer to as the Lens of Human Understanding:

The Lens of Human Understanding

Once I learned The Lens of Human Understanding, so many things fell into place.

Not only did I understand myself better, but I could instantly see what was driving other people, and how my behavior would either create more conflict or resolve it.

But when you don’t know what makes people tick, it’s very easy to get ticked off, or to tick them off.

Here’s looking at you … and other people … and their behaviors … in a brand new way.

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Categories: Blogs

Inspirational Quotes, Inspirational Life Quotes, and Great Leadership Quotes

Fri, 06/26/2015 - 05:51

I know several people looking for inspiration.

I believe the right words ignite or re-ignite us.

There is no better way to prime your mind for great things to come than filling your head and hear with the greatest inspirational quotes that the world has ever known.

Of course, the challenge is finding the best inspirational quotes to draw from.

Well, here you go …

3 Great Inspirational Quotes Collections at Your Fingertips

I revamped a few of my best inspirational quotes collections to really put the gems of insight at your fingertips:

  1. Inspirational Quotes – light a fire from the inside out, or find your North Star that pulls you forward
  2. Inspirational Life Quotes -
  3. Great Leadership Quotes – learn what great leadership really looks like and how it helps lifts others up

Each of these inspirational quotes collection is hand-crafted with deep words of wisdom, insight, and action.

You'll find inspirational quotes from Charles Dickens, Confucius, Dr. Seuss, George Bernard Shaw, Henry David Thoreau, Horace, Lao Tzu,  Lewis Carroll, Mahatma Gandhi, Oprah Winfrey, Oscar Wilde, Paulo Coelho, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Stephen King, Tony Robbins, and more.

You'll even find an inspirational quote from The Wizard of Oz (and it’s not “There’s no place like home.”)

Inspirational Quotes Jump Start

Here are a few of my favorites inspirational quotes to get you started:

“Courage doesn’t always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, ‘I will try again tomorrow.’”

Mary Anne Radmacher

“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go, instead, where there is no path and leave a trail.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.”

Dr. Seuss

“It is not length of life, but depth of life.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by every moment that takes your breath away.”

Anonymous

“You live but once; you might as well be amusing.”

Coco Chanel

“It is never too late to be who you might have been.”

George Eliot

“Smile, breathe and go slowly.”

Thich Nhat Hanh

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

These inspirational quotes are living breathing collections.  I periodically sweep them to reflect new additions, and I re-organize or re-style the quotes if I find a better way.

I invest a lot of time on quotes because I’ve learned the following simple truth:

Quotes change lives.

The right words, at the right time, can be just that little bit you need, to breakthrough or get unstuck, or find your mojo again.

Have you had your dose of inspiration today?

Categories: Blogs

Leadership Skills for Making Things Happen

Sat, 06/20/2015 - 21:48

"A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way." -- John C. Maxwell

How many people do you know that talk a good talk, but don’t walk the walk?

Or, how many people do you know have a bunch of ideas that you know will never see the light of day?  They can pontificate all day long, but the idea of turning those ideas into work that could be done, is foreign to them.

Or, how many people do you know can plan all day long, but their plan is nothing more than a list of things that will never happen?  Worse, maybe they turn it into a team sport, and everybody participates in the planning process of all the outcomes, ideas and work that will never happen. (And, who exactly wants to be accountable for that?)

It doesn’t need to be this way.

A lot of people have Hidden Strengths they can develop into Learned Strengths.   And one of the most important bucket of strengths is Leading Implementation.

Leading Implementation is a set of leadership skills for making things happen.

It includes the following leadership skills:

  1. Coaching and Mentoring
  2. Customer Focus
  3. Delegation
  4. Effectiveness
  5. Monitoring Performance
  6. Planning and Organizing
  7. Thoroughness

Let’s say you want to work on these leadership skills.  The first thing you need to know is that these are not elusive skills reserved exclusively for the elite.

No, these are commonly Hidden Strengths that you and others around you already have, and they just need to be developed.

If you don’t think you are good at any of these, then before you rule yourself out, and scratch them off your list, you need to ask yourself some key reflective questions:

  1. Do you know what good actually looks like?  Who are you role models?   What do they do differently than you, and is it really might and magic or do they simply do behaviors or techniques that you could learn, too?
  2. How much have you actually practiced?   Have you really spent any sort of time working at the particular skill in question?
  3. How did you create an effective feedback loop?  So many people rapidly improve when they figure out how to create an effective learning loop and an effective feedback loop.
  4. Who did you learn from?  Are you expecting yourself to just naturally be skilled?  Really?  What if you found a good mentor or coach, one that could help you create an effective learning loop and feedback loop, so you can improve and actually chart and evaluate your progress?
  5. Do you have a realistic bar?  It’s easy to fall into the trap of “all or nothing.”   What if instead of focusing on perfection, you focused on progress?   Could a little improvement in a few of these areas, change your game in a way that helps you operate at a higher level?

I’ve seen far too many starving artists and unproductive artists, as well as mad scientists, that had brilliant ideas that they couldn’t turn into reality.  While some were lucky to pair with the right partners and bring their ideas to live, I’ve actually seen another pattern of productive artists.

They develop some of the basic leadership skills in themselves to improve their ability to execute.

Not only are they more effective on the job, but they are happier with their ability to express their ideas and turn their ideas into action.

Even better, when they partner with somebody who has strong execution, they amplify their impact even more because they have a better understanding and appreciation of what it takes to execute ideas.

Like talk, ideas are cheap.

The market rewards execution.

Categories: Blogs

Startup Thinking

Thu, 06/18/2015 - 19:36

“Startups don't win by attacking. They win by transcending.  There are exceptions of course, but usually the way to win is to race ahead, not to stop and fight.” -- Paul Graham

A startup is the largest group of people you can convince to build a different future.

Whether you launch a startup inside a big company or launch a startup as a new entity, there are a few things that determine the strength of the startup: a sense of mission, space to think, new thinking, and the ability to do work.

The more clarity you have around Startup Thinking, the more effective you can be whether you are starting startups inside our outside of a big company.

In the book, Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future, Peter Thiel shares his thoughts about Startup Thinking.

Startups are Bound Together by a Sense of Mission

It’s the mission.  A startup has an advantage when there is a sense of mission that everybody lives and breathes.  The mission shapes the attitudes and the actions that drive towards meaningful outcomes.

Via Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future:

“New technology tends to come from new ventures--startups.  From the Founding Fathers in politics to the Royal Society in science to Fairchild Semiconductor's ‘traitorous eight’ in business, small groups of people bound together by a sense of mission have changed the world for the better.  The easiest explanation for this is negative: it's hard to develop new things in big organizations, and it's even harder to do it by yourself.  Bureaucratic hierarchies move slowly, and entrenched interests shy away from risk.” 

Signaling Work is Not the Same as Doing Work

One strength of a startup is the ability to actually do work.  With other people.  Rather than just talk about it, plan for it, and signal about it, a startup can actually make things happen.

Via Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future:

“In the most dysfunctional organizations, signaling that work is being done becomes a better strategy for career advancement than actually doing work (if this describes your company, you should quit now).  At the other extreme, a lone genius might create a classic work of art or literature, but he could never create an entire industry.  Startups operate on the principle that you need to work with other people to get stuff done, but you also need to stay small enough so that you actually can.”

New Thinking is a Startup’s Strength

The strength of a startup is new thinking.  New thinking is even more valuable than agility.  Startups provide the space to think.

Via Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future:

“Positively defined, a startup is the largest group of people you can convince of a plan to build a different future.  A new company's most important strength is new thinking: even more important than nimbleness, small size affords space to think.  This book is about the questions you must ask and answer to succeed in the business of doing new things: what follows is not a manual or a record of knowledge but an exercise in thinking.  Because that is what a startup has to do: question received ideas and rethink business from scratch.”

Do you have stinking thinking or do you beautiful mind?

New thinking will take you places.

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Categories: Blogs

Visionary Leadership: How To Be a Visionary Leader (Or at Least Look Like One)

Mon, 06/08/2015 - 16:41

“Remember this: Anticipation is the ultimate power. Losers react; leaders anticipate.” – Tony Robbins

Have you ever noticed how some leaders have a knack for "the art of the possible" and for making it relevant to the current landscape?

They are Visionary Leaders and they practice Visionary Leadership.

Visionary Leaders inspire us and show us how we can change the world, at least our slice of it, and create the change we want to be.

Visionary Leaders see things early and they connect the dots.

Visionary Leaders luck their way into the future.  They practice looking ahead for what's pertinent and what's probable.

Visionary Leaders also practice telling stories.  They tell stories of the future and how all the dots connect in a meaningful way.

And they put those stories of the future into context.  They don't tell disjointed stories, or focus on flavor-of-the-month fads.  That's what Trend Hoppers do.

Instead, Visionary Leaders focus on meaningful trends and insights that will play a role in shaping the future in a relevant way.

Visionary leaders tell us compelling stories of the future in a way that motivates us to take action and to make the most of what's coming our way.

Historians, on the other hand, tell us compelling stories of the past.

They excite us with stories about how we've "been there, and done that."

By contrast, Visionary Leaders win our hearts and minds with "the art of the possible" and inspire us to co-create the future, and to use future insights to own our destiny.

And Followers, well, they follow.

Not because they don't see some things coming.  But because they don't see things early enough, and they don't turn what they see into well-developed stories with coherence.

If you want to build your capacity for vision and develop your skills as a Visionary Leader, start to pay attention to signs of the future and connect the dots in a meaningful way.

With great practice, comes great progress, and progressing even a little in Visionary Leadership can make a world of difference for you and those around you.

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Categories: Blogs