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Retrospectives – not just for agile teams

thekua.com@work - Fri, 12/11/2015 - 13:14

I was reminded yesterday of the power of retrospectives, even in the context of non-agile software delivery teams. I have recently worked with a programme team who are building a five-year business case (quite a world away from software delivery and one would argue, very waterfall-like). Fortunately, several people have been very open to seeing how agile works in their environment so I facilitated a retrospective looking back over several months.

During the retrospective, we uncovered a number of typical issues that groups encounter: visibility of work, differences in how work should be approached, and general puzzles about the organisation. Better yet, the group came out with concrete steps towards making incremental improvements and an excitement and appreciation for the retrospective practice, something I was particularly pleased by.

Although there are other ways of achieving the same goals, it reminded me of how effective retrospectives create a safe space to discuss and address issues and create a better working environment. Better yet, retrospectives work for everyone, not just for agile teams.

Categories: Blogs

Better Visibility of Complex Agile Projects: An Interview with CareerBuilder

Agile Management Blog - VersionOne - Thu, 12/10/2015 - 15:30

At an Agile Day Atlanta event, we had the opportunity to interview Andy Krupit, the manager, agile development, and Thomas Connell, the team lead, corporate applications support team, at CareerBuilder about why they selected VersionOne Ultimate edition.

In the video below, Krupit talks about how they significantly improved tracking and reporting of complex projects for a global organization which helped them decrease defects by 25%.

Here are some key takeaways from the videos:

Highlights

  • Improved visibility into projects
  • Enhanced tracking of key metrics
  • Decreased defects 25%

Challenges

CareerBuilder has the largest online job site in the U.S. and the global leader in human capital solutions and has agile teams around the world. Initially CareerBuilder’s agile teams were using whiteboards and post-it notes to manage projects. The CIO saw the success of these teams and decided to scale agile across the entire IT organization.  This created a lot of remote teams and the whiteboards and post-it notes just weren’t working anymore. They tried to use some non-agile project management tools they already had in place, but nothing replicated the success they had using whiteboards and post-it notes. They needed an online solution that reproduced the visual and tactile benefits of physically moving cards across a whiteboard in front of their teams.

 Solution

After an extensive evaluation of several leading agile lifecycle management solutions, CareerBuilder was confident that VersionOne provided the best combination of online boards, custom workflows and access to the data. The online boards and custom workflows enabled the remote teams to replicate the success they had with colocated teams and the data allowed them to track progress in ways they couldn’t with whiteboards and post-it notes.

Benefits

“VersionOne provides everyone, from executives to developers, visibility into how we are progressing toward our business goals,” says Krupit. “Before VersionOne they could not efficiently track metrics, but now CareerBuilder is able to help individual teams continually improve quality. In fact, since CareerBuilder implemented VersionOne, defects have decreased 25%.”

Please visit VersionOne’s YouTube page for more video interviews.

The post Better Visibility of Complex Agile Projects: An Interview with CareerBuilder appeared first on The Agile Management Blog.

Categories: Companies

We Took the Pledge! Scaled Agile Makes 1% Equity Commitment to Social Impact Program

Agile Product Owner - Tue, 12/08/2015 - 20:39

we_pledgedI’m excited to announce that Scaled Agile has joined the Pledge 1% campaign, a new corporate philanthropy movement dedicated to making the community a key stakeholder in every business. Over 500 companies have joined the effort in 2015—including our Gold Partner Rally Software/CA Technologies—and next year, the group aims to garner 1000 total pledges.

We made our pledge of 1% equity and employee volunteer time through Entrepreneurs Foundation of Colorado (EFCO). They are based here in Boulder, and created the model upon with the global Pledge 1% program is based.

As a conscientious startup, we wanted to build a culture that represented our core values, and give back to the community in which we live and work. But that’s not always as straightforward as it sounds. Corporate giving can prove daunting for early stage startups who want to give back to their local community, but struggle with finding an entry point that is both meaningful and manageable from an administrative standpoint. The Pledge 1% program provided a turnkey solution that made it easy to include philanthropy in our corporate charter, with EFCO providing all the go-between hustle to get the paperwork handled.

In addition to pledging equity, we’ve launched the Social Responsibility Volunteer Time-Off Program, which allows for 2 half-days off for group volunteer activities, and 8 hours off per year for personal volunteering for each full-time employee. With 30+ employees working in Boulder and regional offices, and a significant expansion plan underway, Scaled Agile is on track to donate over 700 hours of volunteer time in 2016 to the Colorado Front Range community.

This has been one of the best decisions we ever made. As I look the Pledge 1% list, it’s not only impressive, but inspiring to imagine the collective impact of hundreds of companies and thousands of people dedicating their time, talent and resources to strengthen communities around the world. We hope that you will find inspiration for your company to join us.

Through the Pledge 1% campaign, you can find a local or regional program to support your philanthropy program. Whether you’re a startup or post-IPO company, you can pledge any combination of equity, product, or employee time for your local community.

Stay SAFe,
—Dean and the Scaled Agile Team

Categories: Blogs

Improving Product Quality with Agile: An Interview with ABB Enterprise Software

Agile Management Blog - VersionOne - Tue, 12/08/2015 - 15:21

At an Agile On Deck event, we had the opportunity to interview Scott Madden, senior director, product operations at ABB Enterprise Software, to find out why the organization selected VersionOne Ultimate edition.

In the video below, Scott talks about how they increased on-time delivery to 91%, decreased the defect backlog 40%, and decreased defects released to the customers 30%.

Highlights

  • ABB transitioned 800 team members to a single enterprise agile platform and agile methodology in seven weeks
  • On-time delivery has increased to 91%
  • Defect backlog has decreased 40%
  • Defects released to customers has decreased 30%

Challenges

ABB is a world leader in electrical engineering comprised of nine separate business units. Each of ABB’s business units are run by a product manager who had their own processes, architecture and tools. Management was manually collecting consolidating spreadsheets from disparate teams all around the world. ABB’s siloed product management organizations and spreadsheets made visibility into the progress of the entire enterprise portfolio extremely difficult. The senior leadership team recognized that they needed more visibility across the nine business units to improve on-time delivery and product quality.

Solution

ABB transitioned 800 team members from using different tools and development process to using a single enterprise agile platform and agile methodology in seven weeks. After an extensive evaluation of several leading agile solutions, ABB was confident that VersionOne provided the best combination of enterprise agile software and guidance from enterprise agile transformation experts to help them go from many different teams with many different methodologies and different ways of reporting on those methodologies to a single system that brought them all together.

Benefits

Since ABB implemented VersionOne the defect backlog has decreased 40%, defects released to customers have decreased 30%, and on-time delivery has increased to 91%. VersionOne enables ABB leadership to get greater visibility directly through the platform to see how individual teams are progressing. Before VersionOne it was nearly impossible to even track quality on a team by team basis, but now ABB is able to help individual teams continually improve quality and accelerate delivery within the context of the enterprise portfolio.

According to Madden, “VersionOne is not just a vendor. They are a partner. From implementation all the way through the life of our relationship with VersionOne, I believe it will be a world-class experience.”

Please visit VersionOne’s YouTube page for more video interviews.

The post Improving Product Quality with Agile: An Interview with ABB Enterprise Software appeared first on The Agile Management Blog.

Categories: Companies

Learnings from SAFe @ Lego

Agile Product Owner - Mon, 12/07/2015 - 18:35

Hi Folks,

lego_safe_borderDo you have 45 minutes to see one of the most insightful applications and presentations that I’ve yet seen on SAFe? if so, be sure and check out:

Learnings from SAFe @ Lego – Mattias Skarin & Eik Thyrsted Brandsgård at LKCE15

From their description: “In 2014 LEGO Digital Solutions decided to level up Agile and embarked on a SAFe journey. Having Agile teams in place for a couple of years, many linked by a shared platform, this felt as a logical step. Let us share our story, how we got started, the challenges along the ride, what we have learned and things we tweaked. We will round off by sharing a couple of different perspectives from people touched by the journey and our recommendation to others.”

These guys just get it.

Thanks Mattias and Thyrsted!

–Dean

Categories: Blogs

The dark side of gaming metrics

thekua.com@work - Mon, 12/07/2015 - 11:03

I published an article a while ago on how to design for metrics, but I read this well-written, but article of horror, “Why drivers in China intentionally kill the pedestrians they hit.”

This article hits home about the reality of a population gaming a metric and what is leading to a shift in cultural values through their actions. The short story, if you don’t read the article is that it is apparently seen as more economical to pay for someone’s death, than for their healthcare overall combined with a low chance of apparently being caught for murder. Due to the economic cost, it has apparently become acceptable, or at least, very common for someone to finish someone off, rather than pay for what medical aid they made need.

Categories: Blogs

Back to the Future Slides

Leading Answers - Mike Griffiths - Mon, 12/07/2015 - 01:59
Here is a link to my slides from the recent PMI-SAC Professional Development Conference. The theme for the conference was Back to The Future and my presentation explained how projects throughout history have managed uncertainty and how we do it... Mike Griffiths
Categories: Blogs

Em Campbell-Pretty on Info-Q: On management empathy YGTBK!

Agile Product Owner - Fri, 12/04/2015 - 22:43

Prolific scaled agile blogger and SPCT Em Campbell-Pretty opines on Info-Q on her “magic carpet ride” from business owner to agile coach and now, SPCT. She brings a really unique cultural perspective to SAFe and scaled agile in general. In this article she even has the audacity to talk about the need for “management empathy”.  Here’s an excerpt:

You would go to drinks or what have you and people would keep having these conversations: What do we do with management? What do we do with middle management? I was kind of surprised to find that the advice that these coaches were giving each other was things along the lines of “get rid of them” or “work around them”

I guess because in many ways I am the middle manager who went on the journey from management to Agile Coach. I think it is quite achievable and I really try to encourage coaches and consultants to tap into their empathy a bit and try and put themselves in the shoes of these people because a lot of them are living either on the receiving end of a “Go and be Agile” mandate or teams going “We want to be more Agile” and they are very, very much stuck. 

@Em: Management empathy? You’ve Got to be Kidding, right?

More seriously folks, this is an important topic. Agile Transformations don’t go well without the support of middle managers. Sometimes they don’t go at all. And that statement is based entirely on direct experience. That’s why we developed Leading SAFe. Em’s first hand knowledge highlights the importance of collaborating with management for the benefit of all. After all, managers are people just like us, who volunteer for the assignment of managing people just like us. That sounds like a hard job. Maybe we should cut them some slack and take the time and opportunity to engage them in this new way of working.

Categories: Blogs

IBM announces full support of SAFe in Release 6.0.1 of their CLM Solution

Agile Product Owner - Thu, 12/03/2015 - 00:24

We are pleased to report that IBM just announced their end-to-end support of SAFe 3.0 in release 6.0.1 of their CLM (Collaborative Lifecycle Management) solution: Here’s a brief description;

New in the IBM Collaborative Lifecycle Management (CLM) 6.0.1 solution is complete end-to-end support for the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe) which combines tooling with an industry-leading set of best practices and guidance to address the key aspects of an IBM DevOps transformation: people, process and tools. Templates delivered in CLM can help you establish a Portfolio tooling infrastructure with associated Programs and Teams consistent with SAFe—right out of the box!

The support for SAFe in CLM builds on the key concepts of the SAFe process, combining the flexibility and scale you need in your enterprise. Whether you are an organization of purely agile teams, or one that must coordinate work of teams using agile and waterfall processes delivering side-by-side in a multi-speed IT environment, the CLM solution with SAFe can help.

This announcement further extends the depth and breadth of tools that can help enterprises achieve the benefits of SAFe. Thanks IBM!

Check it out here:

 

Categories: Blogs

Deploying Scrum and SAFe at Philips Lighting

Agile Product Owner - Thu, 12/03/2015 - 00:16

A number of us have been been involved in implementing SAFe in various Philips divisions over the last two years. Here’s a short intro to one of the implementations that I just saw on Info Q.

InfoQ interviewed Frank Penning, PMO manager, about the main challenges that Philips Lighting is facing in product development. Penning opines on why Scrum is not enough, how they apply SAFe, and the benefits that they have gained from deploying agile methods for product development.

Read the full story here:

Philips

Man, that’s some pretty smart lighting they are building!

You may also be interested in Philips’s annual glow lighting festival in Eindhoven. Last year the GLOW festival attracted more than 500.000 visitors. That’s twice as many visitors as residents in Eindhoven.  It is absolutely spectacular. If you plan on visiting Holland this is a must see. Check these images out.

 

Categories: Blogs

Deploying Scrum and SAFe at Philips Lighting

Agile Product Owner - Thu, 12/03/2015 - 00:02

A number of us have been been involved in implementing SAFe in various Philips divisions over the last two years. Here’s a short intro to one of the implementations that I just saw on Info Q.

InfoQ interviewed Frank Penning, PMO manager, about the main challenges that Philips Lighting is facing in product development. Penning opines on why Scrum is not enough, how they apply SAFe, and the benefits that they have gained from deploying agile methods for product development.

Read the full story here:.

Screen Shot 2015-12-02 at 11.17.09 AM

 

Man, that’s some pretty smart lighting they are building!

You may also be interested in Philips’s annual glow lighting festival in Eindhoven. Last year the GLOW festival attracted more than 500.000 visitors. That’s twice as many visitors as residents in Eindhoven.  It is absolutely spectacular. If you plan on visiting Holland this is a must see. Check these images out.

 

Categories: Blogs

IBM announces end-to-end support of SAFe in

Agile Product Owner - Wed, 12/02/2015 - 22:43

We are pleased to report that IBM just announced their end-to-end support of SAFe 3.0 in release 6.0.1 of their CLM (Collaborative Lifecycle Management) solution: Here’s a brief description;

New in the IBM Collaborative Lifecycle Management (CLM) 6.0.1 solution is complete end-to-end support for the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe) which combines tooling with an industry-leading set of best practices and guidance to address the key aspects of an IBM DevOps transformation: people, process and tools. Templates delivered in CLM can help you establish a Portfolio tooling infrastructure with associated Programs and Teams consistent with SAFe—right out of the box!

The support for SAFe in CLM builds on the key concepts of the SAFe process, combining the flexibility and scale you need in your enterprise. Whether you are an organization of purely agile teams, or one that must coordinate work of teams using agile and waterfall processes delivering side-by-side in a multi-speed IT environment, the CLM solution with SAFe can help.

This announcement further extends the depth and breadth of tools that can help enterprises achieve the benefits of SAFe. Thanks IBM!

Check it out here:

 

Categories: Blogs

Agile Benefits Management

Leading Answers - Mike Griffiths - Thu, 11/26/2015 - 05:43
Benefits are why we undertake projects. Projects are expensive to undertake and have a risk of failure. So, we need to get benefits from them, or at least think we will get benefits from them, to start projects in the... Mike Griffiths
Categories: Blogs

Pulse 3.0 Alpha

A little madness - Thu, 11/05/2015 - 06:18

With great pleasure I can announce the very first build of Pulse 3.0 is now available from our Alpha Program page! Although this build is very much incomplete and unstable, this is a huge milestone after months of work in both the back and front ends of Pulse.

As this is a larger release we’ve made the choice to release earlier in the cycle than we otherwise would, for a couple of reasons:

  • To show the massive progress that has already been achieved.
  • To solicit feedback about the all-new administration UI (in time to apply said feedback before feature freeze).

We know from previous feedback that the new UI will address some pain points, mainly around quickly navigating and understanding your configuration in a large setup. We’ve also taken advantage of modern browser features to fix clunky corners: e.g. proper history integration and drag-and-drop reordering (no more clickety-click!). With such major changes, though, we’re always keen to hear what you think — good or bad — so we can keep on the right track.

So please do find the time to download and play with an alpha build, then get in touch with us via support email. We’ll be iterating fast on this release stream now, so expect to see updates about regular builds with new UI features each time. Happy building!

Categories: Companies

Why Java keeps plugging along

Indefinite Articles - John Brothers - Mon, 10/26/2015 - 16:39

When I was a young programmer, COBOL was the primary “enterprise” business language. It had a few advantages: everyone knew it, hardware supported it, libraries extended it, no one got fired for using it.

There were several other languages out there, that were used for various projects – FORTRAN, C, Pascal, Ada , to name a few big ones.

But it didn’t matter for “enterprise” software.

In the mid 90s, two things “exploded” – the Internet (because of the World Wide Web) and Java. Over the next decade or so, Java essentially took over as the “enterprise” software leader. Other languages had tried and failed. Java succeeded almost despite itself – the EJB constructs were incredibly clumsy and overly-complicated, it wasn’t super fast, and the language was (and is) often clunky.

But Java came with the Internet in its DNA – and as the Internet exploded, COBOL was simply not equipped to keep up.

Java succeeded because it rode the coattails of the “next big thing” all the way to glory. COBOL simply wasn’t the safe choice anymore, because it was clearly obsolete.

Over time, Java became the safe choice, the one with the libraries that everyone knew.

When you talk about a language displacing Java as the dominant “enterprise” language, you have to have the second part – you need a major upheaval that makes the world realize that Java isn’t the safe choice anymore.

So the key isn’t the features of your language. It’s finding the things that the language can do that Java can’t, and in such a way that it’s obvious Java won’t be able to do it for a long time.

I know Java, I make a living knowing Java, but I also know that it won’t last forever.   But you’re probably not going to replace it anytime soon.

Categories: Blogs

A step-by-step walkthrough of public key signing

Indefinite Articles - John Brothers - Wed, 10/07/2015 - 18:34

Continuing on from my previous walkthrough on public-key cryptography, I also wanted to learn how you can sign documents using the private key, verifying the signature with the public key.

The concept here is verification – was this message sent by someone with access to a specific private key.    For example, consider Paul Revere, waiting for a message from Robert Newman.   What if somehow a British spy knew that Paul was expecting an email from Robert, and wanted to fool Paul by pretending to be Robert.   For Paul to be sure the message is legitimately from Robert, it doesn’t matter whether the message was encrypted with Paul’s public key – after all, anyone could have the public key.  To be verified, the message must be signed by Robert’s private key.    Remember, this isn’t about encryption – the signature is “in the clear” – anyone can see it.

So we need a new public/private key pair for Robert Newman.    Since I’ve already gone through the effort of explaining how to calculate them last time, I’ll just provide you with the numbers themselves this time:

  • n is 221
  • e is 191
  • d is 383

To sign text, you use the private key to create a cryptographic signature.  Robert is following up from the previous email, he wants to tell Paul how many boats the British are rowing across the river.   So he wants to send the message:  “5”.

so:

  • is 5
Signing

The signature s is calculated by the formula:  m^d % n

Remember, d is part of the data that Paul has kept private.  Only he knows what d is.

m^d is 5^383 which is:

5075883674631298446548049111661087093647237699402191163212120642478953395778598947864814858111568572459329182115501791693204142684887253405561412715352359556877432999471390133765317641336487613681905654361561422102765594427495506046899009788830881007015705108642578125

That number modulo n (i.e. 221) is: 177

so:

  • s is 177

So when we send this communication to someone, we send both the message itself “5” and the signature: “177”

Verifying a Signature

To verify the signature, we want to see that s^e mod n  == the message.    Remember, e is part of the public key.

s ^ e is 177 ^ 191 or:

2306183577149085201596305325596159226547118569300925189229389857203796357207862044982857315199283790476827017647730527617852804108867519414430432193245871218986251822073578619863609881193149770246390198636414790783766688663380790017386360674016112360841035988551564172980501137196833264766988401289008585444215905916895724644294397505093631160639335548542153668065643942589783649622290133120663019258868021033347931734637973384273

And that number modulo n (i.e. 221) is:

5

 

And that’s how Paul can know that this message was sent by Robert Newman.

 

Bringing these things together

In the original scenario, Robert Newman wants to tell Paul that the British are coming by sea.   So he encrypted the code number: “3” with Paul’s public key, knowing that only Paul can decrypt it.   As you saw from the encryption demonstration walkthrough, the actual message that Robert sent was the value “70”.

And realistically, we’d want Robert to sign that message “70” with his private key.  This provides the best of both worlds – only Paul can decrypt the message, and it could only have been sent by Robert.

So what is the value of the signature for a message with the value 70?  I leave that as an exercise for you.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Blogs

A step-by-step walkthrough of public key cryptography

Indefinite Articles - John Brothers - Wed, 10/07/2015 - 16:40

The basic concept of public-key cryptography (specifically, the RSA version) is always described as “finding the factors of large numbers is hard”.   So if you can find two large prime numbers, and multiply them together, you get a very large number that is incredibly hard to factorize.

But I’ve struggled with understanding how you get from that fact to encrypted text.     So, using some resources, I finally sat down and tried to walk through a simple example, just so I could get the concept.   This is my story.

Here are two links that describe the basic algorithm:

I used Google Sheets to do my work, and I ran into a problem right away – Google Sheets (and also Excel) can’t handle the ridiculously large numbers that get produced during the algorithm.    So I found a website that provides an arbitrarily large number calculator:

Armed with these four resources, I was able to walk through a toy problem:

It is April 14th, 1775.  Paul Revere is waiting for an encrypted message from Robert Newman, the sexton of the North Church.   Robert will email him a message using Paul’s public key.  Because ‘1’ is boring, the encrypted contents will either be ‘2’ if the British are coming by land, or ‘3’ if the British are coming by sea.

Calculating the Public and Private Key Pair

So first, Paul needs to calculate his public and private key pair.    This being the 18th century, his mathematics are limited.   So he uses very small prime numbers for p and q:

  • p = 11
  • q = 19

Using p and q, he can calculate n  ->  p x q = n == 209

so:

  • n = 209

Now, per the algorithm, he needs to calculate “Theta N” or Theta PQ” depending on who you ask.   I’ll use Theta N

Theta N is (p-1) x (q – 1)  == 180

so:

  • Theta N = 180

Now he has to find a number e such that e is relatively prime to Theta N.   Relatively Prime, in this case, means a number x that doesn’t share any common factors with y.   The simplest version of this is y – 1.    In this case, y is Theta N which is 180.   Which means that e is 180 – 1

so:

  • e = 179

Lastly, he needs to determine d.   d is a number such that d x e modulo Theta N is 1   .   There are a lot of numbers that fulfill this, but a relatively small one is 359  (179 * 359 == 64261) and then that number modulo Theta N is 1:   (64261 % 180 == 1)

so:

  • d = 359

Paul keeps p, q and d a secret.   He gives e and n  to Robert Newman (the sexton of North Church, remember)?

Encrypting

It is now the evening of April 18th, 1775.   Robert Newman is watching from his church steeple, and he sees the British rowing across the Charles river.   “Two if by land, Three if by sea!” Robert Newman cries out.   He quickly gets out his abacus and starts calculating.

 

The encrypted message is the number 3   . The algorithm says  to raise the message to the power of e, and then modulo n .  Remember, Paul gave Robert e and n on the 14th.

so:

  • M = 3

First step, he raises M to the power of e :   3 ^ 179

which is:

25392449348622130779763242573538520583474933800798398908000521914985712447677679339867

And then he uses modulo to calculate the remainder of division by n  (or 209)

766247770432944429179173513575154591809369561091801088 % 209 == 70

so the Ciphertext (C) is 70

This value “70” is what Robert Newman emails to Paul Revere.

Decrypting

Minutes later,  Paul Revere receives the encrypted Ciphertext “70”.   He quickly rushes to his abacus.   To decrypt this message, he needs to raise the value C to the value of d, and then modulo n :

C ^ d is 70 ^ 359 which is the very large number:

245581905687899006065404520776172863944611519146732083123975951780500286553118568921879462320859251758278449748144668631352431481302377928250788881312035116052180416047855183260490937481296130089706428877993897824080669097996701622103603111415606168055270717070910946272013501845364843417445259008414514300000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

(The poor abacus is melting down)

Now he just needs to divide this incredibly large number by n to get the answer.   n is 209, and that incredibly large number modulo 209 is:

Drumroll….

3    !!!

 

Now, the question for you, dear reader, is to determine what the ciphertext would be if the British had been coming by land.    I’ll give you a hint, C ^ d is 726 digits long, the first two digits are 40 and the last two digits are 25.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Blogs

Pulse Admin UI Updates

A little madness - Fri, 09/18/2015 - 06:59

In my previous post, Pulse Roadmap Update, I mentioned that we are working on major changes to the Pulse administration UI. I also mentioned these changes were worthy of their own post, so here we are! After an initial evaluation and prototyping period, work on the new administration UI is now in full swing. We’ve still got months of work to go, but the direction has become clear enough for us to communicate.

As I mentioned previously, the main goals of this rewrite are discoverability and efficiency. We want it to be easier for you to find the configuration you’re after, and faster to make changes when required. We’re also dragging the admin UI from it’s humble lightly-scripted beginnings into the brave new world of HTML5 (we might even drop the quaint “AJAX-powered” terminology from our website

Categories: Companies

Call for sessions XP Days Benelux 2015

xpdayslogo-webXP Days Benelux is an international conference where we learn to bring software to life and grow mature systems that support business needs.

It provides an excellent environment for exchanging ideas, hands-on exercises and extreme experiences.

What are we looking for?

wordle-xpdays7

What are you looking for? What would make it a WOW session for you and our participants?

We’re interested in:

  • Experiences with new and old techniques. What worked; what didn’t? Why? What have you learned?
  • Unexpected ideas from other disciplines and sciences. How can we cross borders? What lessons have we missed? How can we collaborate better with people from other disciplines and departments?
  • Ask for help from other participants. What scary problems confront you and your team?
  • People from outside IT with an interesting story. What can we learn from their experience?
  • Pushing the limits of techniques and organisations, doing the “impossible”. How far can you go if you challenge commonly accepted assumptions?
  • Back to basics. What happens if we really take the Extreme Programming values of Simplicity, Commmunication, Feedback, Courage and Respectseriously?
  • Taking back agile. What does “agile” really mean to you and why is it important?
  • Questioning agile. Where, when and why would you not use agile methods? Why? What can we learn about context and applicability?

The XP Days community loves highly interactive sessions where everyone participates and learns from each other.

During review and selection, your session will receive bonus points when…
  • … you have no slides. Think outside the box and sharpen your story telling skills.
  • … it appeals to both technical and functional people. Involve the geeks, challenge the managers.
  • … it has the “XP Factor”. Is it entertaining and crazy? Does it take people out of their comfort zone?
  • … you’ve had a dry run. Did you join one of our try-outs? Did you send a video introduction?
  • … your subject is fresh and original. Maybe something outside the domain of IT?
  • … it has an original format. Doing something with fruit? Are there any sports involved? Great!
  • … your session poses a question instead of giving an answer.
  • … if you’re new to presenting at XP Days. First timers receive a warm welcome…
How does it work?

You propose your idea for a session: a title and a short description.From then on, organizers and session proposers work together to refine and improve your proposal, adding more information and improving the description and session content. We’ll give feedback and provide opportunities for try-outs. In return, we expect from you that you help others to turn their idea into a WOW session.

Yes but, I haven’t presented at a conference before.

You don’t need to be an experienced presenter, you “just” need one good idea or question to start with. And then you iterate and improve your idea with the help of the other presenters and the organizers.

We offer coaching for first-time presenters. Contact sessions if you want help proposing and refining your session.

Submit your proposal now. You have until July 5th 2015 to propose your idea. The sooner you send in your idea, the more feedback you will receive.

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Knowledge Sharing


SpiraTeam is a agile application lifecycle management (ALM) system designed specifically for methodologies such as scrum, XP and Kanban.