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Indefinite Articles - John Brothers - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 14:25

Usually these life tips are bizarre or stupid. These are the best I’ve seen.

Categories: Blogs

Velocity Is Like A Helium Balloon

BigVisible Solutions :: An Agile Company - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 12:39

Lately I have had many conversations about team velocity. Most of these conversations have had an element in them about increasing team velocity. Questions and statements like, “How can I get the team to increase their velocity?” or “We must complete an additional 20 points this sprint.” Often these ideas are accompanied by extensive velocity analysis, discussions keeping individuals 100% busy and so on.

Velocity Is Like A Helium Balloon

Attempting to directly manipulate team velocity is risky and often counterproductive. It can result in the team simply increasing their story point estimates or in taking shortcuts of quality and design so they can get a better number. Such actions damage the utility of the velocity as an input to planning and hide reality from the decision making process. Rather than worry and work over making velocity go up, remember this:

Download This Image as a Poster!

Velocity is like a balloon. It will rise on its own if nothing is holding it down!

The post Velocity Is Like A Helium Balloon appeared first on BigVisible Solutions.

Categories: Companies

R: Apply a custom function across multiple lists

Mark Needham - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 07:04

In my continued playing around with R I wanted to map a custom function over two lists comparing each item with its corresponding items.

If we just want to use a built in function such as subtraction between two lists it’s quite easy to do:

> c(10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1) - c(5,4,3,4,3,2,2,1,2,1)
 [1] 5 5 5 3 3 3 2 2 0 0

I wanted to do a slight variation on that where instead of returning the difference I wanted to return a text value representing the difference e.g. ’5 or more’, ’3 to 5′ etc.

I spent a long time trying to figure out how to do that before finding an excellent blog post which describes all the different ‘apply’ functions available in R.

As far as I understand ‘apply’ is the equivalent of ‘map’ in Clojure or other functional languages.

In this case we want the mapply variant which we can use like so:

> mapply(function(x, y) { 
    if((x-y) >= 5) {
        "5 or more"
    } else if((x-y) >= 3) {
        "3 to 5"
    } else {
        "less than 5"
    }    
  }, c(10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1),c(5,4,3,4,3,2,2,1,2,1))
 [1] "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "3 to 5"      "3 to 5"      "3 to 5"      "less than 5"
 [8] "less than 5" "less than 5" "less than 5"

We could then pull that out into a function if we wanted:

summarisedDifference <- function(one, two) {
  mapply(function(x, y) { 
    if((x-y) >= 5) {
      "5 or more"
    } else if((x-y) >= 3) {
      "3 to 5"
    } else {
      "less than 5"
    }    
  }, one, two)
}

which we could call like so:

> summarisedDifference(c(10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1),c(5,4,3,4,3,2,2,1,2,1))
 [1] "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "3 to 5"      "3 to 5"      "3 to 5"      "less than 5"
 [8] "less than 5" "less than 5" "less than 5"

I also wanted to be able to compare a list of items to a single item which was much easier than I expected:

> summarisedDifference(c(10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1), 1)
 [1] "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "5 or more"   "3 to 5"      "3 to 5"     
 [8] "less than 5" "less than 5" "less than 5"

If we wanted to get a summary of the differences between the lists we could plug them into ddply like so:

> library(plyr)
> df = data.frame(x=c(10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1), y=c(5,4,3,4,3,2,2,1,2,1))
> ddply(df, .(difference=summarisedDifference(x,y)), summarise, count=length(x))
   difference count
1      3 to 5     3
2   5 or more     3
3 less than 5     4
Categories: Blogs

See LeanKit’s Mobile Apps in Action

LeanKit goes with you wherever the work needs to be done. Our iOS and Android mobile apps help you stay connected to your team while you’re away from your desk. Quickly create new cards, update status, reassign work, and add comments or image attachments to ensure everyone has the most recent information to keep the work flowing.

The post See LeanKit’s Mobile Apps in Action appeared first on Blog | LeanKit.

Categories: Companies

Post Assembla events to your favorite chat apps: Slack, HipChat, Flowdock & more

Assembla Blog - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 02:26

If your team uses Slack, HipChat, Flowdock, or Bigplans for communication, we have added preconfigured webhooks to make setting up these integrations painless. Once configured, you can selectively manage the Assembla events that are posted out to these apps, such as ticket activity, commits, deploys, etc., to monitor project activity in real-time, inline with other team communication.

To get started, click on the desired integration below: slack logo HipChat Logo flowdock logo Bigplans logo
Categories: Companies

Making Sense of Complexity

TV Agile - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 22:23
A recent Gartner report identified the importance of the Cynefin framework for IT departments as a sense-making methodology, suggesting a significant market share by 2016. Cynefin is emerging as one of the main approaches to understanding complexity within the Agile community and provides a means to integrate, and understand the proper boundary conditions between methods […]
Categories: Blogs

Interested in cryptocurrencies? Get started with 1000 free Ripple XRP

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 20:55

ripple logo

Ripple is a protocol for value exchange that makes it easy to transfer and trade fiat currencies, Bitcoin, or XRP - the native asset of the Ripple network.

Assembla is giving away 1000 free XRP (the Ripple native cyptocurrency) to any person with software development skills who is interested in learning about Ripple development. Get it here: https://www.assembla.com/ripple

I called Ripple Labs a few months ago to find out more about ways that their "gateway" can help us pay developers in many different countries. Essentially, we do banking for the developers on our global team. We pay internal accounts, hold the money until they ask for it, and then transfer money to them by bank wire, ATM/Payoneer, or other mechanisms. We have found that the bank wire system is embarrassingly slow and unreliable. This is the problem that Ripple is trying to fix. Their gateway is like a bank in an open-source box. It keeps accounts in any currency, including USD, other currencies, XRP, and Bitcoin. It can transfer those accounts instantly and reliably on the shared "ledger." It is also gaining exciting new features such as "multi-signature" which enables outsourcing and crowdsourcing customers to post a budget amount, and then transfer it to their hard-working suppliers through an arbitrator.

Now I am working more closely with Ripple to help them scale up their development process. I decided to make this free XRP offer for two reasons:

  • Users need 20 XRP to activate a Ripple wallet. We want to remove the hassle from acquiring the XRP so new developers can get started.
  • We want to build an email list of developers that might be interested in working on internal development, bounties, or bank integration projects.
ripple blog CTA
Categories: Companies

New Feature Beta Release: Progress

sprint.ly - scrum software - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 20:35

Tags have always been an important tool in Sprint.ly. Tagging items allows for targeted filtering and is a central feature for organizing and prioritizing sprints and iterations. Today, tags get even a bigger spotlight.

Our team is excited to announce the beta release of a major new Sprint.ly feature: Progress. We designed this report to show burn down and measurable progress over time for each tag in your product.

  • “Give me a progress report.”
  • “When will we be done?”
  • “How much work have we finished so far?”
  • “Who do we have working on this?”
  • “What tickets are we working on?”

Progress answers these are the critical project needs and questions.

Progress has been released in beta to a handful of our customers and we will be spending the next few weeks gathering feedback. We’ll incorporate the feedback and release it to the rest of our customers on select plans within a few weeks.

I’m thrilled to share this new feature and as always, I had a great time working with our Sprint.ly design and development team on it. In the words of our founder Joe Stump  “Wow. I am excite.”

Cheers,

Phuong

P.S. Progress told us when we would be done with this feature and yes, it was right!

Categories: Companies

Agile Product Management

Scrum Expert - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 19:10
Product Management practices remains a skill difficult to pin down in its scope and responsibility. This article discusses how Product Management can exist within an Agile-oriented organization. It explains that it is an organizational level activity with responsibilities, decision-making and influences far beyond the scope of the software itself. Without the Product Manager, the Product Owner cannot do his job, as the business context for the software solution is lost. Paul Raymond, Inflectra Corporation, http://www.inflectra.com/ The problem with any formal examination of Product Management is that it is probably the least well ...
Categories: Communities

Assembla Bigplans Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 18:26

If you use Assembla and Bigplans, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your Bigplans chat room. Check out below for configuration instructions.

Bigplans is a simple, integrated way to manage a distributed team.  It includes a "lean" task board, real-time chat, and a unique "advisor" (a real person) that helps you get on-demand resources if you need them.  For programming teams, it includes a tight integration with Assembla login and Assembla tickets. 

You can use the Webhooks tool to feed Assembla events into any of your team chats.  To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select Bigplans from the list of pre-configured post options:

Bigplans Assembla Webhook

You will need to obtain and update the auth token in the “Content” section.

To obtain your Bigplans auth token:

Visit Bigplans and navigate to the plan you want to post Assembla events to. Click on the ‘Connect’ option in the top bar. Under the “Message API” section, there is a section called “API Token” that will display your token. If no token is set, click on the ‘Reset’ button. Copy the token ID and replace the “BIGPLANS_AUTH_TOKEN” in the Webhook tool.

Bigplans Assembla Webhook Token

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your Bigplans chat room and click ‘Add and Authenticate.” Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured Bigplans chat room:

Bigplans Assembla Webhook Chat

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

Test

Indefinite Articles - John Brothers - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 18:14

I changed permissions on my home directory, making sure I can still do stuff with my apps

Categories: Blogs

Validation and the Standing Desk

Leading Agile - Mike Cottmeyer - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 16:36

Validation is an engineering activity. In many ways it’s very much how engineers tell a product, “you’re awesome!”

Unfortunately, many people don’t really understand what engineering validation really is. They think it’s something that happens at the end of all the other work. Often people who don’t understand validation think it’s performed on the finished product. Specifically that it’s only performed on the finished product in the form of “testing.”

Yes, you test the product at the end, but how do you know the product will work when placed into service in the users’ environments? As they intended to use it and as you intended it to be used? In fact, how do you know–when you only test at the end–whether the idea behind how you think the user will use it and how they think they will want to use it are in sync?

Validation takes place much earlier than at the end when the product is tested. Validation can even strongly influence design and construction. When used to validate requirements, design, construction or integration concepts, validation is likely to mitigate the risk of spending expensive engineering and construction hours on a product that might not be as useful or might be over-engineered for the way in which it will be used.

As an engineer I have countless examples of validation at work in the real world. In fact, a few years ago I wrote this blog and video about the Apple iPhone 4 signal interference fiasco where it was found that a known electrical design flaw in the body of the phone was allowed to remain in the product on the claim that “no one will use it that way” only later to be “validated” by the user community. Still, plenty of people don’t understand how validation adds value prior to testing.

For some time I had contemplated using a standing desk but never did anything about it. (A desk that’s up high enough to work while standing.)  A back muscle injury taking longer than I’d like to heal got me thinking about the desk again and so I began researching standing desks in earnest. Of course, I also looked at a number of “do it yourself” options that would be aesthetically pleasing, cost-effective and would satisfy my life-hack geekery.

I also looked at the space in which this desk would be placed and realized I would have to find somewhere for my current desk to live. Though not ideal or long-term, a temporary home for the current desk would likely be found in a kid’s room until we’d need to supplement it with a way for more than one kid to work at it at once.

This is when I had the following thought: just raise your current desk! (Note that these mental iterations are full of both design, integration and validation considerations, as well as “verification” which are all subjects for other times.) I turned to envisioning various ways to raise the current desk and settled on an idea that would have occurred to me first had this been presented to me in college: ‘milk crates.’

I would place a pair of milk crates under each of the legs of the desk (which are actually rails/skids and not four classic legs) and they would simply raise the entire desk. I wouldn’t need to reconfigure the desk in any other way. Everything on the desk–as well as how I use it–could remain as is. What more could I ask for? As long as the milk crates would raise the desk enough for me to stand at it and use it comfortably, I’d be all set.

So I researched the sizes and styles of milk crates, compared these dimensions to the desk and verified that raising the desk by the height or depth of a milk crate would be sufficient for me. I selected inexpensive milk crates from the national department store chain with the bulls-eye logo.

Due to the particular construction of my desk (note earlier comment about non-classic legs) as well as the lower structural strength of the lesser expensive crates, I decided that placing wood boards on the crates and placing the desk onto the boards would provide better strength, durability, and stability to the whole “towering” assembly. BONUS! I happened to have bookshelf boards left over from a bookcase we had dismantled and disposed of long ago. After moving within our first home from basement to top floor then moving with us again to two homes these “assemble-at-home” shelving units just couldn’t handle the stress and their exoskeletons gave up their respective ghosts. But their shelves were perfectly in-tact and strong. In other words, perfect for their next role as planks for my desk to stand on.

Milk crates and boards strategically placed by the sides of my desk, I was ready to have my wife help me heave the desk into the air as we enlist one of our kids to slide the board-topped crates into place underneath.

But, one last check.validation

I’d really hate for the whole affair to go down only to find that the height wouldn’t actually be enough. Yes I verified the dimensions, and yes, I verified that the design was logical, and I had even placed the board on a pair of crates and stood on them to ensure that the crates we bought were as structurally sound as they were expected to be. But really, how hard could it be to simulate the new height of the desk? Not hard at all. All I need would be to place a milk crate *on* the desk and see whether the added height would meet my needs.

And that’s when it happened.

Not only would the added height meet my needs but this simple validation action resulted in a complete redesign of my idea that is not only easier to carry out, but I can also easily undo it if we want. In fact, this validation activity resulted in a design that uses less material, requires less (almost no) lifting and even adds usable space to my desk.

Instead of putting the desk on four milk crates and two boards I put two milk crates on my desk! With the open end of the crates facing forward and one board across the two crates, my laptop, mouse and phone now sit on the board, and the space beneath is available for stuff. The only adjustment required was to move the second monitor to the top of the hutch (which I wasn’t using productively anyway).

The space behind the crates is still accessible and now has a bunch of the stuff I barely touched–from previously on top of the hutch.

Among the many unexpected benefits of this validation one was much more profoundly unexpected. Had anyone suggested putting crates on top of my desk instead of underneath? Before I saw what it looked like when I actually did it, the idea would likely have been rejected on the face of it. (Superficially, it is not as pleasing to the eye.)

This is why we do validation.

Had I waited to “test” my newly heightened desk after it was up on crates, I would have certainly been pleased with the results. My desk would be as it always was–only higher–and it would be at a good height and entirely usable. It would have consumed the resources allocated to it and been on budget. Instead, the validation gave me an even more functional product, for half the resources and budget and perhaps 20% of the expected manual effort.

Or… you can just keep waiting for “testing” to do your validation.

The post Validation and the Standing Desk appeared first on LeadingAgile.

Categories: Blogs

Why You Should Limit “Work in Progress”

BigVisible Solutions :: An Agile Company - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 14:56

Why You Should Limit “Work in Progress”

Sometimes I sit down at the end of a day or even a week and am dismayed that I don’t seem to have really accomplished anything. I know I was very busy and I know I was working hard on important things, but why don’t I have anything to show for it?

This scenario is as common for teams as it is for individuals. Most of the time the underlying problem is excessive Work In Progress, or WIP. WIP is anything that you have started but not yet completed. Code waiting for testing is WIP. A design you have “finished” but need approval for is WIP. A requirement you have started to look at but don’t yet understand is WIP.
Excessive WIP is bad for three important reasons. First, it exhausts us mentally. Anything I have started but not finished occupies some part of my available mental capacity. The more WIP, the more my mental energy is consumed with trying to keep track of it all. Add to that the time and energy lost in context switching and the add burden of WIP can become overwhelming.
Second, excessive WIP leads us down the garden path of mistaking activity for accomplishment. When we have a near infinite stream of things to work on and the task at hand bogs down, needs help from elsewhere, becomes unclear, or otherwise becomes “blocked”, we can easily set it aside and pick up something else to work on.

So what is wrong with that? Presumably, the thing we were working on has some measure of importance; otherwise we wouldn’t have been working on it. When we set it aside we make an implicit prioritization that whatever I am going to work on instead is now more important. Of course we probably didn’t think of it that way. We more likely thought, “I can’t just sit around, I need to be busy” and so, rather than exert ourselves to get our original task moving forward we can just set it aside and move on to something else. We focus on being “busy”, not on accomplishing valuable work.

Finally, excess WIP hides process problems and other wastes lurking in our system. I adapted this picture from similar images used to show the undesirable effect of excess inventory in manufacturing. For us, and WIP represents inventory.WIP It is partially completed work sitting around waiting to be finished.

The water is our WIP. When we have plenty of WIP, plenty of other work we can switch to, the rocks below the surface remain undetected. It is only by limiting our WIP (lowering the water level), that we can detect the wastes that are taking up our time and resources. When I first saw a picture like this it didn’t make sense to me. Why lower the water level to the point that you start hitting the rocks? Seems like a bad plan! But the truth is that the “rocks” are lurking down there, robbing us of time and energy. Perhaps more importantly, they are creating whirlpools and rip currents that are keeping us from being productive. We are expending a lot of energy being busy, but we are not really getting anywhere.

If we get serious about limiting our work in progress we will be able to identify and address the impediments to a smooth flow of work and increase our productivity while likely decreasing our business. When in doubt: Stop starting things and start finishing things!

Want actionable tidbits that can help you improve your agile practices? Sign up for our weekly ‘Agile Eats’ email, with “bite-sized” tips and techniques from our coaches…they’re too good not to share.

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The post Why You Should Limit “Work in Progress” appeared first on BigVisible Solutions.

Categories: Companies

AgileChina, Beijing, China, 27-30 July 2014

Scrum Expert - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 14:28
AgileChina is a four-day conference about Agile and Scrum that will take place in Beijing. It is part of the TiD Conference that integrates resources and forces of SPIChina, ChinaTest and AgileChina. Agile China will start with a day of tutorials followed by three days of sessions both in Chinese and English. In the agenda of AgileChina you can find topics like “Scrum Mastery – Essential Skills for Team Excellence”, “Essential Patterns of Mature Agile Leaders”, “Software is a Side Effect: Your Real Job is Rapid Learning”, “Exploring Scrum of ...
Categories: Communities

Assembla & Slack Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 14:23

If you use Assembla and Slack, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your Slack chat room/channel. Check out below for configuration instructions.

To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select Slack from the list of pre-configured post options:

Slack Assembla Webhook

You will need to setup an incoming webhook service integration within Slack to obtain your token. To do this, visit https://YourSubdomain.slack.com/services/new/incoming-webhook, select the desired channel to post to, and click ‘Add Incoming Webhook.’

describe the image

Once created, copy the provided Webhook URL and update the External URL in Assembla’s Webhook tool.

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your Slack room/channel and click ‘Add and Authenticate.' Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Tip: Within the Slack “Incoming Webhook” page that you set up for this integration, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and expand the “Integration Settings” where you can add a label, change the post-to channel, and change the icon and name for your webhook bot.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured Slack room/channel:

describe the image

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

Assembla & HipChat Integration How-To

Assembla Blog - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 13:40

If you use Assembla and HipChat, we have added a pre-configured webhook making it easy to post Assembla events out to your HipChat chat room. Check out below for configuration instructions. 

To get started, you will need the Webhook tool installed in the Assembla project you want to configure. If you do not have the Webhook tool installed, visit the Admin tab > Tools section > and click ‘Add’ next to the Webhook tool.

Once installed, click on the Webhook tool in your main navigation and select HipChat from the list of pre-configured post options:

HipChat Assembla Webhook

You will need to obtain and update the auth token and room ID in the “Content” section.

To obtain your HipChat auth token:

You will need to visit https://YourSubdomain.hipchat.com/admin/api and enter your password to access the “API Auth Tokens” page. Under “Create new token” select ‘Notification’ type, provide a label, and click ‘Create.’ Copy the token ID and replace the “HIPCHAT_AUTH_TOKEN” in the Webhook tool.

describe the image

To obtain your HipChat room ID:

Visit https://YourSubdomain.hipchat.com/admin/rooms and click on the desired room you would like to post Assembla events to. Copy the App ID and replace the “HIPCHAT_ROOM_ID” in the Webhook tool.

describe the image

Now configure what Assembla events you would like to post to your HipChat room and click ‘Add and Authenticate.” Don’t forget to enable the configuration under the “Title” field.

Your Assembla events will now be posted to the configured HipChat room:

HipChat Assembla Example Chat

If you have any questions or problems during setup, please contact support@assembla.com. If you do not have an Assembla project and would like to test out this integration, try Assembla out for free.

Categories: Companies

Five links on Software Design

Let go of your notions of what the system should or should not be and try to see the new design as it emerges before you.

Don Wells

henrik.signature

 

 

 

I don’t claim these articles to be the best on this subject, but I have enjoyed reading them and they have made my knowledge grow. I recommend you to have a look if you are interested in the subject. Happy reading!

Follow me on twitter @hlarsson for more links on a daily basis. You may also subscribe to weekly newsletter of my links. Thanks to writers of these articles and Kirill Klimov for collecting the agile quotes: http://agilequote.info/. Please follow @agilequote for more quotes.


Categories: Blogs

The Next 7 Habits of Highly Effective Coaches

Portia Tung - Selfish Programming - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 11:00
Food for Thought

The Next 7 Habits of Highly Effective Coaches is the new addition to my mini series inspired by the style of Paul Coelho‘s “Manual of the Warrior of Light“. You can find the first 7 habits here.

BONUS: You can download the entire series published in the PragProg Magazine:

For more ideas on personal and team development, take a look at “The Dream Team Nightmare - Boost Team Productivity Using Agile Techniques“. Happy Coaching!

Categories: Blogs

A handy guide for coaching Product Owners

Growing Agile - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 10:11

We often coach Product Owners. One of the things we’ve come to realise over time is that 2 day theoretical courses out of the office are not a great way to help Product Owners. Although these courses are useful and help to teach concepts which are important for good Product Ownership they leave a gap because very few Product Owners have the time to apply what they have learned when they get back to the office. Through some experimentation we discovered that a much better approach (or one that works well in conjunction with training) is to run short workshops where Product Owners learn a technique and apply it to their work in the same workshop. We’ve run so many of these workshops that we used them to create a series of books to help others coach Product Owners.

But where do you get started? Especially with new Product Owners? Recently we ran a workshop with a group of Product Owners to identify what workshops would help them best. We asked them to look at twelve areas and decide if those things were working well for them, needed improvement or were not important for them. We consciously removed any Scrum terminology from the areas.

PO A handy guide for coaching Product OwnersHere they are:

  1. Communicating status to stakeholders
  2. Setting predictable dates
  3. Creating and managing a product roadmap
  4. Prioritising the list of work
  5. Aligning work to the company’s strategic goals
  6. Giving clear requirements to the development team
  7. Getting what you need from development
  8. Splitting work into small independent pieces
  9. Releasing high quality solutions into production
  10. Managing project work versus urgent support requests
  11. Estimating how long something will take, and what it will cost
  12. Deciding what needs to be in a first release

We also asked if there were other areas of concern, but from our experience the initial issues most Product Owners struggle with are those listed above. Once we have a view of how each Product Owner feels we can select workshops to tackle the areas most people want help with.

Here is a list of workshops we might run based on the areas mentioned above, as well as a reference to the book or blog posts where you can find out more.

Area Workshop Reference Book or Post Communicating status to stakeholders Stakeholders Mastering Backlogs Setting predictable dates Release Dates Release Planning Creating and managing a product roadmap Current Roadmap Release Planning Prioritising the list of work Portfolio Prioritisation Release Planning Aligning work to the company’s strategic goals Impact Mapping Impact Mapping Giving clear requirements to the development team User Stories Agile Requirements Getting what you need from development Acceptance Tests Agile Requirements Splitting work into small independent pieces Splitting Stories Agile Requirements Releasing high quality solutions into production Acceptance Tests Agile Requirements Managing project work versus urgent support requests Prioritisation Prioritsation Technique Estimating how long something will take, and what it will cost Estimation Estimation Workshop Deciding what needs to be in a first release Story Maps Release Planning

 

Categories: Companies

Knowledge Sharing


SpiraTeam is a agile application lifecycle management (ALM) system designed specifically for methodologies such as scrum, XP and Kanban.